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Integration of leadership training for graduate and medical students engaged in translational biomedical research: Examining self-efficacy and self-insight

  • Celia Chao (a1) (a2), Kevin Wooten (a3) (a4), Heidi Spratt (a2) (a5), Huda Sarraj (a2), Judith Aronson (a2) (a6), Jonathan Hommel (a2) (a7), Ross Ungerleider (a8), Jamie D. Ungerleider (a9) and Mark R. Hellmich (a1) (a5)...

Abstract

Introduction

Formal training in team leadership is not taught in biomedical research graduate training programs or medical schools.

Methods

We piloted a Leadership Training Workshop for graduate biomedical and medical students enrolled in our Interprofessional Research Design Course.

Results

The Kane–Baltes self-efficacy survey demonstrated improved leadership skills (median scores pretraining and post-training were 71 and 76.6; paired t-test, p=0.04).

Conclusions

Most students demonstrated significant improvement in self-awareness pertaining to their own innate leadership styles.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: Celia Chao, M.D., Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), 301 University Boulevard, Route 0737, Galveston, TX 77555-0737, USA. (Email: cechao@utmb.edu)

References

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Keywords

Integration of leadership training for graduate and medical students engaged in translational biomedical research: Examining self-efficacy and self-insight

  • Celia Chao (a1) (a2), Kevin Wooten (a3) (a4), Heidi Spratt (a2) (a5), Huda Sarraj (a2), Judith Aronson (a2) (a6), Jonathan Hommel (a2) (a7), Ross Ungerleider (a8), Jamie D. Ungerleider (a9) and Mark R. Hellmich (a1) (a5)...

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