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Development and preliminary evaluation of a patient portal messaging for research recruitment service

  • Kelly T. Gleason (a1), Daniel E. Ford (a2), Diana Gumas (a2), Bonnie Woods (a2), Lawrence Appel (a2), Pam Murray (a2), Maureen Meyer (a1) and Cheryl R. Dennison Himmelfarb (a1)...

Abstract

Introduction

We developed a service to identify potential study participants through electronic medical records and deliver study invitations through patient portals.

Methods

The service was piloted in a cohort study that used multiple recruitment methods.

Results

Patient portal messages were sent to 1303 individuals and the enrollment rate was 10% (n=127). The patient portal enrollment rate was significantly higher than email and post mail (4%) strategies.

Conclusion

Patient portal messaging was an effective recruitment strategy.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: K. T. Gleason, School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, 525 N Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. (Email: kgleaso2@jhmi.edu)

References

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