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A consult service to support and promote community-based research: Tracking and evaluating a community-based research consult service

  • C. M. Pelfrey (a1), K. D. Cain (a2), M. E. Lawless (a3), E. Pike (a2) and A. R. Sehgal (a2) (a4) (a5)...

Abstract

Purpose

This study describes the design, operation, and evaluation of a community-based research (CBR) consult service within the setting of a Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) institution. To our knowledge, there are no published evaluations of a CBR consult service at a CTSA hub.

Methods

A CBR consult service was created to support faculty, health-care providers/research coordinators, trainees, community-based organizations, and community members. A framework was developed to assess the stages of client engagement and to foster clear articulation of client needs and challenges. A developmental evaluation system was integrated with the framework to track progress, store documents, continuously improve the consult service, and assess research outcomes.

Results

This framework provides information on client numbers, types, services used, and successful outreach methods. Tracking progress reveals reasons that prevent clients from completing projects and facilitates learning outcomes relevant to clients and funding agencies. Clients benefit from the expert knowledge, community connections, and project guidance provided by the consult service team, increasing the likelihood of study completion and achieving research outcomes.

Conclusion

This study offers a framework by which CTSA institutions can expand their capacity to conduct and evaluate CBR while addressing challenges that inhibit community engagement.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: C. M. Pelfrey, Ph.D., Center for Medical Education, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. (Email: clara.pelfrey@case.edu)

References

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3. Strand, K, et al. Principles of best practice for community-based research. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning 2003; 9: 515.
4. Strand, K. Community-based research as pedagogy. Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning 2000; 7: 8596.
5. NCRR Fact Sheet: Clinical Translational Science Awards. Researchers and Their Communities: The Challenge of Meaningful Community Engagement [Internet]. National Center for Research Resources. 2009 [cited Apr 21, 2016]. (https://ctsacorus.org/resources/273/download/Monograph-ResearchersTheir_Communities-CTSA-2007-08_3.pdf)
6. Carter-Edwards, L, et al. Report on CTSA consortium use of the community engagement consulting service. Clinical and Translational Science 2013; 6: 3439.
7. Martinez, LS, et al. Clinical and translational research and community engagement: implications for researcher capacity building. Clinical and Translational Science 2012; 5: 329332.
8. Holzer, J, Kass, N. Community engagement strategies in the original and renewal applications for CTSA grant funding. Clinical and Translational Science 2014; 7: 3843.
9. Bodison, SC, et al. Engaging the community in the dissemination, implementation, and improvement of health-related research. Clinical and Translational Science 2015; 8: 814819.
10. Harris, PA, et al. Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) – a metadata-driven methodology and workflow process for providing translational research informatics support. Journal of Biomedical Informatics 2009; 42: 337381.
11. CTSC. Clinical and Translational Science Collaborative (CTSC) Logic Model [Internet]. 2014 [cited Apr 21, 2016]. (https://casemed.case.edu/ctsc/cores/documents/CTSC%20Logic%20Model%20_11-2014.pdf)

Keywords

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Supplementary materials

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Supplementary materials

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A consult service to support and promote community-based research: Tracking and evaluating a community-based research consult service

  • C. M. Pelfrey (a1), K. D. Cain (a2), M. E. Lawless (a3), E. Pike (a2) and A. R. Sehgal (a2) (a4) (a5)...

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