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Community engagement and pediatric obesity: Incorporating social determinants of health into treatment

  • Joseph A. Skelton (a1) (a2) (a3), Deepak Palakshappa (a1) (a4), Justin B. Moore (a5), Megan B. Irby (a6), Kimberly Montez (a1) and Scott D. Rhodes (a3) (a7)...

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a complex and multi-faceted problem, with contributors ranging from individual health behaviors to public policy. For clinicians who treat pediatric obesity, environmental factors that impact this condition in a child or family can be difficult to address in a clinical setting. Community-clinic partnerships are one method to address places and policies that influence a person’s weight and health; however, such partnerships are typically geared toward community-located health behavior change rather than the deeper social determinants of health (SDH), limiting effective behavioral change. Community-engaged research offers a framework for developing community-clinic partnerships to address SDH germane to obesity treatment. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between SDH and pediatric obesity treatment, use of community-clinic partnerships to address SDH in obesity treatment, and how community engagement can be a framework for creating and harnessing these partnerships. We present examples of programs begun by one pediatric obesity clinic using community-engagement principles to address obesity.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: J. A. Skelton, MD, MS, Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd., Winston-Salem, NC27157, USA. Email: jskelton@wakehealth.edu

References

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Keywords

Community engagement and pediatric obesity: Incorporating social determinants of health into treatment

  • Joseph A. Skelton (a1) (a2) (a3), Deepak Palakshappa (a1) (a4), Justin B. Moore (a5), Megan B. Irby (a6), Kimberly Montez (a1) and Scott D. Rhodes (a3) (a7)...

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