Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

2460: Change in duration of postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in esophagectomy patients: Outcomes in a single academic institution

  • Sue Wang, Gavitt A. Woodard, Calixto-Hope Lucas, Stanley J. Rogers and David M. Jablons...

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy (ILE) is an invasive surgical procedure with a high incidence of postoperative pneumonia. Antibiotic prophylaxis could reduce respiratory infections but increase Clostridium difficile and antibiotic resistance. Our institution reduced the duration of piperacillin-tazobactam prophylaxis following ILE from 4 to 1 day or less in January 2015. We evaluated short-term outcomes in ILE patients before and after this institutional change. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Retrospective cohort study of all ILE patients from 2012 to 2016. We confirmed antibiotic duration directly from nursing medication administration records. The primary outcomes of this study were rates of C. difficile and postoperative pneumonia. Secondary outcomes include other infection, length of hospital stay, and readmission within 30 days. We used logistic regression to analyze impact of days of antibiotics and χ2 or Fischer exact tests for categorical variables. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Of 104 ILE patients, 40.4% (n=42) were after January 2015, 11.5% developed pneumonia and 5.8% developed C. difficile colitis. ILE patients received more days of antibiotics before the institutional change compared with after (6.1 vs. 2.9 d, p<0.01). For a 1-day increase in antibiotic duration, the odds of acquiring C. difficile increased significantly by 1.2 (p=0.03). Before compared with after the institutional change, rates of C. difficile were 8.1% Versus 2.4% (p>0.2), rates of pneumonia were 11.3% Versus 11.9% (p>0.2), and length of stay was 10.9 Versus 10.5 days (p>0.2), respectively. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: Institutional policy can have an impact on patient outcomes. Antibiotic stewardship is associated with reduced rates of inpatient C. difficile. Our study suggests reduced antibiotics are not associated with pneumonia, although larger studies are necessary to confirm this finding. Surgeons should consider the benefit of decreased rates of C. difficile before administering prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis following esophagectomies.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      2460
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      2460
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      2460
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed