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206 Perceptions of the COIVD-19 Pandemic on Social, Mental, and Physical Health of Native American and Latino Communities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2023

Teresa Warne
Affiliation:
Montana State University, Department of Health and Human Development, Bozeman, MT
Charlie Gregor
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Institute of Translational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA
Linda K Ko
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Health Systems and Population Health, Seattle, WA
Paul K Drain
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Department of Global Health, Seattle, WA
Georgina Perez
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Institute of Translational Health Sciences, Seattle, WA
Selena Ahmed
Affiliation:
Montana State University, Department of Health and Human Development, Bozeman, MT
Virgil Dupuis
Affiliation:
Salish Kootenai College, Extension Office, Pablo, MT
Lorenzo Garza
Affiliation:
Sunnyside School District, Family and Community Engagement, Sunnyside, WA
Alex Adams
Affiliation:
Montana State University, Center for American Indian and Rural Health Equity, Bozeman, MT
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted health systems and exposed disparities in access to health care among underserved populations. We examined how the pandemic shaped social, mental, and physical health among Native American and Latino communities in rural and underserved areas. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Using Theory of Planned Behavior, Social Cognitive Theory, and Social Contextual Factor frameworks, we developed interview guides to examine perceptions of the COVID-19 pandemic on social, mental, and physical health among community members. Stakeholders of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Reservation in Montana and the Hispanic/Latinx population in Yakima Valley in Washington were selected through purposeful community-engagement. A total of six focus group discussions and 30 key informant interviews were administered in both communities. A codebook was developed and deductive coding was applied to informant responses, followed by an inductive, constant comparison approach. The codebook was further refined and inter-rater agreement was completed by three analysts. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Four themes were highlighted as areas impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic (mental and physical health, family dynamics, and social disruptions) with few differences among geographic areas or between focus group (n=39) and key informant (n=28) participants. Perceived impacts on mental health included increased stress, anxiety, and depression, while pandemic-related lifestyle or family changes impacted physical health. Participants reported changes to family routines and dynamics due to staying home, social distancing, and more frequent interactions inside or limited interactions outside the household respectively. Social distruptions reported included impacts on finances, employment, and household staples, though participants highlighted how many community members stepped up to help those in need. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The COVID-19 pandemic had similar impacts on two geographically distinct underserved communities in Montana and Washington. Understanding the community’s experience with the COVID-19 pandemic is critical to identify strategies to support families, community needs, and mental and physical health in underserved communities.

Type
Health Equity and Community Engagement
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2023. The Association for Clinical and Translational Science