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Developing students' ideas of diversity in the ancient and modern worlds through the topic of Alexandria in the Cambridge Latin Course, Book II

  • Jonathan Barnes

Extract

My interest in undertaking a study relating to Classics and issues of diversity in the classroom is the result of several personal and circumstantial approaches to the subject, which have become more pronounced in my mind since the start of my Postgraduate Certificate of Education at the University of Cambridge.

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References

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Bradley, M. (2010). Classics and Imperialism in the British Empire. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press.
Bloom, B.S. (1956). Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Volume 1. New York: David McKay Company.
Bolgar, R.R. (1963). A Theory of Classical Education I. Didaskalos I.1. pp. 5–26
Cartledge, P. (1998). Classics: from discipline in crisis to (multi-)cultural capital. In Too, Y.L. & Livingstone, N., Pedagogy and Power. Rhetorics of Classical Learning (pp. 1629). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Department for Education (2014) Special Educational Needs in England: January 2014 [webpage]. Retrieved from: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/362704/SFR26-2014_SEN_06102014.pdf.
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If you enjoyed this, you might also read:
Pike, M. (2016). Latin for the 21st Century. JCT 33, pp. 67.
Sawyer, B. (2016). Latin for All Identities. JCT 33, pp. 3539.

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Developing students' ideas of diversity in the ancient and modern worlds through the topic of Alexandria in the Cambridge Latin Course, Book II

  • Jonathan Barnes

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