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Socioeconomic, demographic and environmental determinants of infant mortality in Nepal

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Bhakta Gubhaju
Affiliation:
National Centre for Development Studies, Australian National University, Bangladesh
Kim Streatfield
Affiliation:
Department of Demography, Australian National University, Canberra
Abul Kashem Majumder
Affiliation:
Department of Statistics, University of Chittagong, Bangladesh

Summary

The Nepal Fertility and Family Planning Survey of 1986 demonstrated that demographic variables, previous birth interval and survival of preceding child, still predominated as determinants of infant mortality, particularly in rural areas of Nepal. However, in urban Nepal, where the level of socioeconomic development is higher, an environmental variable, along with previous birth interval and survival of preceding child emerges as important in determining infant mortality. Separate policy measures for child survival prospects in rural and urban Nepal are suggested.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 1991, Cambridge University Press

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References

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