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Sex preferences for offspring among men in the western area of Sierra Leone

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Eugene K. Campbell
Affiliation:
Department of Demography, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana

Summary

This study reveals evidence of a significant sex preference among men. Programmes aimed at changing men's views on the importance of the sex of a child must be implemented in order to reduce the desired family size and eventual fertility.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

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References

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