Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-jxh9h Total loading time: 18.802 Render date: 2021-04-20T05:34:57.848Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Parental education and child mortality in Burundi

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Josephine O'Toole
Affiliation:
Centre for Population Studies, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London
Robert E. Wright
Affiliation:
Centre for Population Studies, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London

Summary

This paper examines the relationship between parental education and child mortality in Burundi using data collected in the 1987 Demographic and Health Survey. Proportional hazards models are estimated to examine this relationship, while holding constant other known child mortality determinants. Parental education proves to be a key factor in explaining differences in child mortality, the effect of maternal education being particularly strong compared to paternal education.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Caldwell, J. C. (1979) Education as a factor in mortality decline: an examination of Nigerian data. Popul. Stud. 33, 395.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Caldwell, J. C. (1986) Routes to low mortality in poor countries. Popul. Dev. Rev. 12, 171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, L. C. (1983) Child survival: levels, trends and determinants. In: Determinants of Fertility in Developing Countries, Vol. 1, Supply and Demand for Children, pp. 199232. Edited by Bulatao, R. A. & Lee, R. D.. Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
Cleland, J. & Van Ginneken, J. K. (1988) Maternal education and child survival in developing countries: the search for pathways of influence. Social Sci. Med. 27, 1327.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Coosemans, M. H. (1985) Evaluation of antimalarial drugs in a region with a high prevalence of chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum. Ann. Soc. Belg. med. trap. 65 (Supplement), 115.Google Scholar
Cox, D. R. (1972) Regression models and life tables. J. R. Statist. Soc. B 34, 187.Google Scholar
Hobcraft, J., McDonald, J. W. & Rutstein, S. O. (1984) Socioeconomic factors in infant and child mortality: a cross national comparison. Popul. Stud. 38, 183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hobcraft, J., McDonald, J. W. & Rutstein, S. O. (1985) Demographic determinants of infant and early child mortality: a comparative analysis. Popul. Stud. 39, 363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lindenbaum, S., Chakrabooty, M. & Elias, M. (1985) The Influence of Maternal Education on Infant and Child Mortality in Bangladesh. ICCRB Special Publication No. 23, Dhaka, Bangladesh.Google Scholar
Nortman, D. (1984) Parental Age as a Factor in Pregnancy Outcome and Child Development. Reports on Population and Family Planning No. 16. Population Council, New York.Google Scholar
Rutstein, S. O. (1984) Infant and Child Mortality: Levels, Trends and Demographic Differentials (revised edn).WFS Comparative Studies No. 43. International Statistical Institute, Voorburg, Netherlands.Google Scholar
World Bank (1987) World Development Report. Oxford University Press, New York.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 39 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 20th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Parental education and child mortality in Burundi
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Parental education and child mortality in Burundi
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Parental education and child mortality in Burundi
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *