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On the Couch: The Alpha Male in Therapy in Contemporary American Television Drama

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 January 2018

PETER TEMPLETON
Affiliation:
School of the Arts, English and Drama, Loughborough University. Email: p.a.r.templeton@lboro.ac.uk.
Corresponding

Abstract

As ideas of masculinity have changed in the United States, so too has the presentation of men on television. This article, then, explores a range of characters that have characteristics associated with the alpha male in the unusually vulnerable position of the patient, in a variety of programmes from generic detective dramas through to critically acclaimed productions, to analyse how programme makers navigate questions of masculinity against the cultural backdrop of the most recent fin de siècle. It also demonstrates a range of responses by programme makers, including some that question hypermasculine tendencies only to ultimately reinforce them.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and British Association for American Studies 2018 

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Ibid

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