Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

The role of a soil × dietary sulphur interaction in the impairment of copper absorption by ingested soil in sheep

  • N. F. Suttle (a1), P. Abrahams (a2) and I. Thornton (a2)

Summary

Four repletion experiments were carried out to clarify the roles of molybdenum, sulphur and iron in the inhibition of copper absorption by ingested soils. In each experiment, groups of four to six hypocupraemic Scottish Blackface ewes were repleted for 21 days with diets containing CuSO4 and/or soil Cu and the responses in plasma Cu used to assess the availability of the Cu supplied.

In Expts 1 and 2, three soils varying in Mo but high in Fe content and derived from Lower Lias Clay, Namurian Shale and Weald loam were added at 100 g/kg D.M. to diets of low (1·0) and high (4·1 g/kg D.M.) S contents: they provided 3·1, 2·8 and 0·1 mg Mo/kg D.M. respectively. When compared with groups given no soil, each soil increased plasma Cu repletion in the low S experiment and decreased it in the high S experiment. Inhibition was thus not completely dependent on soil Mo but dependent upon dietary S.

Soils varying in Fe content were compared in the manner of the above experiments in Expts 3 and 4. Two Fe-rich soils, developed from the Upper Chalk and a Barton Clay and providing 2·8 and 1·5 g Fe/kg D.M., impaired Cu repletion on the high S diet but not on the low S diet. A soil, developed on a sand from the Bagshot Beds and providing only 0·15 g Fe/kg D.M., did not impair repletion but FeSO4, providing 0·8 g Fe/kg D.M. did so, irrespective of dietary S content. Ingestion of Fe-rich soils in a high S diet caused three-fold increases in rumen sulphide concentrations 5 and 24 h after feeding. It is suggested that soil ingestion impairs Cu absorption in sheep by trapping S as heavy metal sulphides such as FeS and releasing sulphide in the acid abomasum.

Copyright

References

Hide All
Abdellatif, A. M. M. (1968). Conditioned hypocuprosis: some effects of diet on copper storage in ruminants. Verslagen van Landbouwkundige Onderzoekingen 709, 4367.
Bird, P. R.Fountain, R. D. (1970). Method for determination of sulphur in some biological materials. Analyst (London) 95, 98102.
Bray, A. C. (1969). Sulphur metabolism in the rumen. II. The absorption of inorganic sulphate and inorganic sulphide from the sheep's rumen. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 20, 739748.
Bremner, I., Phillippo, M., Humphries, W. R., Young, B. W.Mills, G. F. (1983). Effects of iron and molybdenum on copper metabolism in calves. In Proceedings of Joint BVA/BSAP Conference on Trace Element Deficiencies and Disorders in Livestock, York (ed. Suttle, N., Gunn, R. G., Allen, W. M., Linklater, K. A. and Wiener, G.). Occasional Publication of The British Society of Animal Production, No. 7, p 136.
Campbell, A. G., Coup, M. R., Bishop, W. H.Wright, D. E. (1974). Effect of elevated iron intake on the copper status of grazing cattle. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 17, 393399.
Gawthorne, J. G.Nader, C. J. (1976). The effect of molybdenum on the conversion of sulphate to sulphide and microbial-protein-sulphur in sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 35, 1123.
Grace, N. D.Suttle, N. F. (1979). Some effects of sulphur intake on molybdenum metabolism in sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 41, 125136.
Humphries, W., Phillippo, M., Young, B. W.Bremner, I. (1983). The influence of dietary iron and molybdenum on copper metabolism in calves. British Journal of Nutrition 49, 7786.
Lanqlands, J. P., Bowles, J. E., Donald, G. E.Smith, A. J. (1982). The nutrition of ruminants grazing native and improved pastures. V. Effects of stocking rate and soil ingestion on the copper and selenium status of grazing sheep. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 33, 313320.
McGrath, D., Poole, D. B. R., Fleming, G. A.Sinnott, J. (1982). Soil ingestion by grazing sheep. Irish Journal of Agricultural Research 21, 135145.
Smith, B. S. W.Wright, H. (1975). Copper: molybdenum interaction: effect of dietary molybdenum on the binding of copper to plasma proteins in sheep. Journal of Comparative Pathology 85, 299305.
Suttle, N. F. (1974 a). A technique for measuring the biological availability of copper to sheep using hypocupraemic ewes. British Journal of Nutrition 32, 395405.
Suttle, N. F. (1974 b). Effects of organic and inorganic sulphur on the availability of dietary copper to sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 32, 559568.
Suttle, N. F. (1975). Trace element interactions in animals. In Trace Elements in Soil-Plant-Animal Systems (ed. Nicholas, D. J. D. and Egan, A. R.), pp. 271289. (Proceedings of the Jubilee Symposium of the Waite Agricultural Institute, Glen Osmond, S.A., November 1974.)
Suttle, N. F. (1981). The metabolism absorption and interactions of copper in ruminants. In Proceedings of the Sheep and Beef Cattle Society of the New Zealand Veterinary Association: llth Seminar, Massey University, N.Z., pp. 210.
Suttle, N. F., Abrahams, P.Thornton, L. (1982). The importance of soil type and dietary sulphur in the impairment of copper absorption in sheep which ingest soil. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 41, 83A.
Suttle, N. F.Field, A. C. (1968). Effect of intakes of copper molybdenum and sulphate on copper metabolism in sheep. 1. Clinical condition and distribution of copper in blood of the pregnant ewe. Journal of Comparative Pathology 78, 351362.
Suttle, N. F.Mclauchlan, M. (1976). Predicting the effects of dietary molybdenum and sulphur on the availability of copper to ruminants. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 35, 22A.
Suttle, N. F.Price, J. (1976). The potential toxicity of copper-rich animal excreta to sheep. Animal Production 23, 233241.
Suttle, N. F., Thornton, I.Alloway, B. J. (1975). An effect of soil ingestion on the utilization of dietary copper by sheep. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 83, 249254.
Wiener, G., Suttle, N. F., Field, A. C., Herbert, J. G.Woolliams, J. A. (1978). Breed differences in copper metabolism in sheep. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 91, 433441.

The role of a soil × dietary sulphur interaction in the impairment of copper absorption by ingested soil in sheep

  • N. F. Suttle (a1), P. Abrahams (a2) and I. Thornton (a2)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed