Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Effects of high temperature after anthesis on starch granules in grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

  • P. LIU (a1), W. GUO (a1), Z. JIANG (a1), H. PU (a1), C. FENG (a1), X. ZHU (a1), Y. PENG (a1), A. KUANG (a2) and C. R. LITTLE (a3)...

Summary

The effect of high temperatures (above 25°C) on starch concentration and the morphology of starch granules in the grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were studied. Wheat plants of cultivars Yangmai 9 (weak-gluten) and Yangmai 12 (medium-gluten) were treated with high temperatures for 3 days at different times after anthesis. The results showed that the starch concentration of grains given a heat-shock treatment above 30°C were lower than those developing at normal temperature in both cultivars. High temperature lowered starch concentration due to the decrease of amylopectin. Under the same temperature, the effect of heat shock from 6 to 8 days after anthesis (DAA) was the greatest, whereas from 36 to 38 DAA the effect was the least. The effects of high temperatures after anthesis on starch-pasting properties were similar to those on starch concentration, especially after 35–40°C treatments. The size, shape and structure of starch granules in wheat grains (determined by electron microscopy) after heat shock were visibly different from the control. When given heat shock during development, the starch granules in mature wheat grains were ellipsoid in shape and bound loosely with a protein sheath in Yangmai 9, while they were damaged and compressed with fissures in Yangmai 12, indicating the differences in resistance to high temperature between cultivars. Ratios of large (type-A) and small (type-B) starch granules significantly decreased under heat shock, which limited the potential sink size for dry matter deposition in the grain.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Effects of high temperature after anthesis on starch granules in grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Effects of high temperature after anthesis on starch granules in grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Effects of high temperature after anthesis on starch granules in grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence . The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.

Corresponding author

*To whom all correspondence should be addressed. Email: guows@yzu.edu.cn

References

Hide All
Baler, R., Zou, J. & Voellmy, R. (1996). Evidence for a role of HSP70 in the regulation of the heat shock response in mammalian cells. Cell Stress and Chaperones 1, 3339.
Bayles, R. A. (1977). Poorly filled grain in the cereal crop. I. The assessment of poor grain filling. Journal of National Institution of Agricultural Botany 14, 232240.
Bhullar, S. S. & Jenner, C. F. (1985). Differential responses to high temperatures of starch and nitrogen accumulation in the grain of four cultivars of wheat. Australian Journal of Plant Physiology 12, 363375.
Bowler, C., Van Montagu, C. & Inze, D. (1992). Superoxide dismutase and stress tolerance. Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology 43, 83116.
Chiotelli, E. & Le Meste, M. (2002). Effect of small and large wheat starch granules on thermomechanical behavior of starch. Cereal Chemistry 79, 286293.
Feng, C. N., Guo, W. S., Shi, J. S., Peng, Y. X. & Zhu, X. K. (2000). Effect of high temperature after anthesis on endosperm cell development and grain weight in wheat. Acta Agronomica Sinica 26, 399405.
Guo, W. S., Shi, J. S., Peng, Y. X., Feng, C. N., Ge, C. L. & Zhu, X. K. (1998). Effect of high temperature on transportation of assimilates from wheat flag leaf during grain filling stage. Acta Agriculturae Nucleatae Sinica 12, 2127.
He, Z. F. (1985). Analysis Technique for Grain Quality of Cereals and Oils. Beijing, China: China Agriculture Press.
Hendershot, K. L. (1992). Induction temperature of heat-shock protein synthesis in wheat. Crop Science 32, 256261.
Jenner, C. F. (1994). Starch synthesis in the kernel of wheat under high temperature conditions. Australian Journal of Plant Physiology 21, 791806.
Morell, M. K., Rahman, S., Abrahams, S. L. & Appels, R. (1995). The biochemistry and molecular biology of starch synthesis in cereals. Australian Journal of Plant Physiology 22, 647660.
Panozzo, J. F. & Eagles, H. A. (1998). Cultivar and environmental effects on quality characters in wheat. I. Starch. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 49, 757766.
Rane, J. & Nagarajan, N. (2004). High temperature index-for field evaluation of heat tolerance in wheat varieties. Agricultural Systems 79, 243255.
Rodrigo, J., Rivas, E. & Herrero, M. (1997). Starch determination in plant tissues using a computerized image analysis system. Physiologia Plantarum 99, 105110.
SAS Institute Inc (1997). SAS/STAT User's Guide, Release 6.12. Cary, NC: SAS Institute, Inc.
Shah, N. H. & Paulsen, G. M. (2003). Interaction of drought and high temperature on photosynthesis and grain-filling of wheat. Plant and Soil 257, 219226.
Sung, D. Y. & Guy, C. L. (2003). Physiological and molecular assessment of altered expression of Hsc70–1 in Arabidopsis. Evidence for pleiotropic consequence. Plant Physiology 132, 979987.
Viswanathan, C. & Khanna-Chopra, R. (2001). Effect of heat stress on grain growth, starch synthesis and protein synthesis in grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties differing in grain weight stability. Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science 186, 17.
Yan, S. H., Yin, Y. P., Li, W. Y., Liang, T. B., Li, Y., Wu, Y. H., Wang, P., Geng, Q. H., Dai, Z. M. & Wang, Z. L. (2008). Effect of high temperature during grain filling on starch accumulation, starch granule distribution, and activities of related enzymes in wheat grains. Acta Agronomica Sinica 34, 10921096.
Zhao, H., Dai, T. B., Jing, Q., Jiang, D., Cao, W. X., Lu, W. & Tian, X. W. (2006). Effects of high temperature during grain filling on key enzymes involved in starch synthesis in two wheat cultivars with different quality types. Acta Agronomica Sinica 32, 423429.
Zhou, Z. Q., Zhu, X. T., Wang, W. J. & Lan, S. Y. (2001). Observation on the amyloplasts in endosperm of wheat varieties with different kernel types by scanning electron microscope. Journal of Chinese Electron Microscopy Society 20, 178184.

Effects of high temperature after anthesis on starch granules in grains of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

  • P. LIU (a1), W. GUO (a1), Z. JIANG (a1), H. PU (a1), C. FENG (a1), X. ZHU (a1), Y. PENG (a1), A. KUANG (a2) and C. R. LITTLE (a3)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed