Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-8sgpw Total loading time: 0.426 Render date: 2021-02-28T22:40:48.988Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Effect of dietary condensed tannins on gastrointestinal nematodes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 January 2002

N. L. BUTTER
Affiliation:
School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK
J. M. DAWSON
Affiliation:
School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK
D. WAKELIN
Affiliation:
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK
P. J. BUTTERY
Affiliation:
School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, UK

Abstract

It has been previously shown in this laboratory that feeding a model condensed tannin, quebracho tannin, reduces the small intestinal nematode burden in sheep and rats. The aim of the current programme was to determine whether this occurs through direct toxicity against the parasites. Both in vivo and in vitro studies were conducted. The first study compared the effect of dietary quebracho tannin (40 g/kg) on the establishment of the parasitic nematodes Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Trichinella spiralis in the rat small intestine. The burden of N. brasiliensis, which, although closely associated with the mucosa, actually dwells within the small intestinal lumen, was significantly reduced (P<0·001) by dietary quebracho tannin. In contrast, T. spiralis, which penetrates into the small intestinal mucosa, was unaffected (>0·05) by the dietary inclusion of quebracho tannin. The second study involved monitoring the survival of adult N. brasiliensis and T. spiralis when incubated in vitro in varying concentrations of quebracho tannin in Hanks’ balanced salt solution. The survival of N. brasiliensis was compromised at concentrations as low as 0·01% (w/v) quebracho tannin but improved with the addition of 0·1% (w/v) polyethylene glycol, which binds to, and inactivates, tannin. T. spiralis was similarly affected, but much more rapidly. These results suggest that dietary quebracho tannin may reduce nematode worm burdens through a toxic effect that requires direct contact between parasite and tannin. This raises the possibility that feeding locally available plant material containing condensed tannins may be an alternative method for controlling parasite infections, especially in areas such as the tropics and subtropics.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 46 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 28th February 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Effect of dietary condensed tannins on gastrointestinal nematodes
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Effect of dietary condensed tannins on gastrointestinal nematodes
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Effect of dietary condensed tannins on gastrointestinal nematodes
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *