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THE EFFECTS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY ON PRODUCTIVITY AND INPUT DEMANDS IN U.S. AGRICULTURE

  • JEAN-PAUL CHAVAS (a1), GUANMING SHI (a1), RICHARD NEHRING (a2) and KYLE STIEGERT (a1)

Abstract

U.S. agriculture has seen a rapid adoption of biotechnology over the last two decades. This study investigates how biotechnology has affected U.S. farm input demand and agricultural productivity. The analysis relies on data at the national level and at the state level for selected states in the Corn Belt. It evaluates the rate of technological change and price elasticities of demand for agricultural inputs over time. The study documents the evolving biases in technological change in agriculture. It finds evidence that farm input demands have become more price inelastic.

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Copyright

This is a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. Outside of the United States, this is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author's e-mail: jchavas@wisc.edu

Footnotes

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We thank James MacDonald and three anonymous reviewers for useful comments on an earlier draft of the paper. This paper was financially supported in part by a research grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), National Institute of Food and Agriculture and a cooperative agreement with the USDA.

Footnotes

References

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Keywords

THE EFFECTS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY ON PRODUCTIVITY AND INPUT DEMANDS IN U.S. AGRICULTURE

  • JEAN-PAUL CHAVAS (a1), GUANMING SHI (a1), RICHARD NEHRING (a2) and KYLE STIEGERT (a1)

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