Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Responding to mental health statutory drivers: experience of a low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy programme

  • R. Mills (a1), W. Mowlds (a2), K. F. W. Dyer (a3), P. Corr (a4) and M. Kavanagh (a1)...

Abstract

Objectives

Stress control (SC), a brief psycho-education course, was implemented to increase access to psychological therapies in line with Northern Irish mental health service statutory drivers. The first aim of this study was to gauge the efficacy of SC in a robust manner with clinical significance testing. The second aim was to assess whether demographics traditionally ‘hard-to-reach’ – males, younger adults and those from deprived areas – accessed SC. The third aim was to elucidate what prompted their access and the experiences of attendees at SC.

Methods

Attendees at SC were 170 adults over six iterations of the course. Pre- and post-questionnaires included the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales – 21, captured demographic details and qualitative feedback, which was subject to a mixed-methods analysis.

Results

SC attendees reported significant decreases on depression, anxiety and stress sub-scales post-intervention. Moreover, 38.71% (n=36) of attendees who completed SC exhibited clinically significant improvement afterwards on one or more sub-scale. Attendance figures for males, younger adults and those classified as socioeconomically deprived were modest. Patterns within the data suggested prospective success for targeting these cohorts.

Conclusions

SC attracted people in need of mental healthcare input and affected quantifiable change within those people’s lives, while satisfying statutory demands for service delivery in an accessible community context. Recommendations to increase engagement with those traditionally ‘hard-to-reach’ for psychological services are provided, which, if implemented, have the potential to achieve further compliance with Northern Irish mental health statutory drivers.

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: M. Kavanagh, Department of Clinical Psychology, School of Psychology, The David Keir Building, 18-30 Malone Road, The Queen’s University of Belfast, BT9 5BP, Northern Ireland. (Email: rmills05@qub.ac.uk)

References

Hide All
Antony, MM, Bieling, PJ, Cox, BJ, Enns, MW, Swinson, RP (1998). Psychometric properties of the 42-item and 21-item versions of the depression anxiety stress scales in clinical groups and a community sample. Psychological Assessment 10, 176181.
Bamford Review of Mental Health and Learning Disability (2007). A Comprehensive Legal Framework for Mental Health and Learning Disability. Bamford Review of Mental Health and Learning Disability: Northern Ireland.
Bennett-Levy, J, Richards, DA, Farrand, P (2010). Low intensity CBT interventions: a revolution in mental health care. In Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions (ed. J. Bennett-Levy, D. Richards, P. Farrand, H. Christensen and K. Griffiths), pp. 318. Oxford University Press: New York, NY.
Creswell, JW (2013). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. Sage: Thousand Oaks, CA.
Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (2012). Protect Life. Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety: Northern Ireland.
Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (2013). Transforming your Care: Vision to Action. Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety: Northern Ireland.
Griner, D, Smith, TB (2006). Culturally adapted mental health intervention: a meta-analytic review. Psychotherapy 43, 531548.
Gyani, A, Shafran, R, Layard, R, Clark, DM (2013). Enhancing recovery rates: lessons from year one of IAPT. Behaviour Research and Therapy 51, 597606.
Henry, JD, Crawford, JR (2005). The short‐form version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS‐21): construct validity and normative data in a large non‐clinical sample. British Journal of Clinical Psychology 44, 227239.
Hsieh, HF, Shannon, SE (2005). Three approaches to qualitative content analysis. Qualitative Health Research 15, 12771288.
Jacobson, NS, Truax, P (1991). Clinical significance: a statistical approach to defining meaningful change in psychotherapy research. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 59, 1219.
Kellett, S, Clarke, S, Matthews, L (2007). Delivering group psychoeducational CBT in primary care: comparing outcomes with individual CBT and individual psychodynamic‐interpersonal psychotherapy. British Journal of Clinical Psychology 46, 211222.
Lovibond, SH, Lovibond, PF (1995). Manual for the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, II edn., Psychology Foundation: Sydney.
Maybin, E, Dyer, K (2011). A Baseline Service Evaluation of Individuals Attending a Trauma Service. Belfast Health & Social Care Trust Report: Northern Ireland.
Northern Ireland Statistics & Research Agency (2010). Northern Ireland Multiple Deprivation Measure 2010. Northern Ireland Statistics & Research Agency: Northern Ireland.
Singleton, N, Bumpstead, R, O’Brien, M, Lee, A, Meltzer, H (2003). Psychiatric morbidity among adults living in private households, 2000. International Review of Psychiatry 15, 6573.
Van Daele, T, Van Audenhove, C, Vansteenwegen, D, Hermans, D, Van Den Bergh, O (2013). Effectiveness of a six session stress reduction program for groups. Mental Health & Prevention 1, 1925.
White, J (1998). Stress control large group therapy for generalized anxiety disorder: two year follow-up. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy 26, 237245.
White, J (2008). Stepping up primary care. Psychologist 21, 844847.
White, J (2010). Large group didactic CBT classes for common mental health problems. In Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions (ed. J. Bennett-Levy, D. Richards, P. Farrand, H. Christensen and K. Griffiths), pp. 313321. Oxford University Press: New York, NY.
Young, JE, Rygh, JL, Weinberger, AD, Beck, AT (2007). Cognitive therapy for depression. In Clinical Handbook of Psychological Disorders: A Step-by-Step Treatment Manual, 4th edn. (ed. D. H. Barlow), pp. 250305. Guilford Press: New York, NY.

Keywords

Responding to mental health statutory drivers: experience of a low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy programme

  • R. Mills (a1), W. Mowlds (a2), K. F. W. Dyer (a3), P. Corr (a4) and M. Kavanagh (a1)...

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed.