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Conversion disorder, sexual abuse and interprofessional communication – some lessons to be re-learned

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2014

Paul Myatt
Affiliation:
Department of Child Psychiatry, Greenwich District Hospital, London, SE10, England

Abstract

We describe an adolescent boy who presented with physical symptoms, for which no organic cause could be found. He proved a challenge to medical management and we highlight the reluctance to consider making a diagnosis of conversion disorder. Significant medical contact since infancy, a history of sexual abuse, and current stressors are considered as having contributed to his presentation. We discuss general issues in the management of conversion disorder and consider the risks of neglecting this diagnosis as technological advances are made and sophisticated investigations are relied upon.

Type
Brief Reports
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

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