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Meditating on rights and responsibility: remarks on ‘the limits and burdens of rights’

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 December 2020

Kathryn Sikkink
Affiliation:
Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States
Corresponding

Abstract

Kratochwil's critique of rights as a dominant moral theory that cannot avoid ‘hegemonic’ politics appears to be too crude. This article suggests that more theoretical and practical attention to the responsibilities necessary to implement rights could address some of Kratochwil's concerns. The language of political and ethical responsibilities is often missing from the practical action discourse of human rights. The article emphasizes the multitude of potential ‘agents of justice’ and how they can discharge forward-looking responsibilities in open and discretionary ways.

Type
Book Symposium: In the Midst of Theory and Practice
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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