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Enhancing ‘meaningfulness’ of functional assessments: UK adaptation of the Amsterdam IADL questionnaire

  • Gemma Stringer (a1), Iracema Leroi (a2), Sietske A. M. Sikkes (a3) (a4), Daniela Montaldi (a1) and Laura J. E. Brown (a5)...

Abstract

Objective:

Commonly used measures of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) do not capture activities for a technologically advancing society. This study aimed to adapt the proxy/informant-based Amsterdam IADL Questionnaire (A-IADL-Q) for use in the UK and develop a self-report version.

Design:

An iterative mixed method cross-cultural adaptation of the A-IADL-Q and the development of a self-report version involving a three-step design: (1) interviews and focus groups with lay and professional stakeholders to assess face and content validity; (2) a questionnaire to measure item relevance to older adults in the U.K.; (3) a pilot of the adapted questionnaire in people with cognitive impairment.

Setting:

Community settings in the UK.

Participants:

One hundred and forty-eight participants took part across the three steps: (1) 14 dementia professionals; 8 people with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), or dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease; and 6 relatives of people with MCI or dementia; (2) 92 older adults without cognitive impairment; and (3) 28 people with SCD or MCI.

Measurements:

The cultural relevance and applicability of the A-IADL-Q scale items were assessed using a 6-point Likert scale. Cognitive and functional performance was measured using a battery of cognitive and functional measures.

Results:

Iterative modifications to the scale resulted in a 55-item adapted version appropriate for UK use (A-IADL-Q-UK). Pilot data revealed that the new and revised items performed well. Four new items correlated with the weighted average score (Kendall’s Tau −.388, −.445, −.497, −.569). An exploratory analysis of convergent validity found correlations in the expected direction with cognitive and functional measures.

Conclusion:

The A-IADL-Q-UK provides a measurement of functional decline for use in the UK that captures culturally relevant activities. A new self-report version has been developed and is ready for testing. Further evaluation of the A-IADL-Q-UK for construct validity is now needed.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Correspondence should be addressed to: Gemma Stringer, Division of Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. Phone +44 (0)161 306 7493. Email: gemma.stringer@manchester.ac.uk

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Enhancing ‘meaningfulness’ of functional assessments: UK adaptation of the Amsterdam IADL questionnaire

  • Gemma Stringer (a1), Iracema Leroi (a2), Sietske A. M. Sikkes (a3) (a4), Daniela Montaldi (a1) and Laura J. E. Brown (a5)...

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