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Prevalence of anxiety disorders in community dwelling older adults in Hong Kong

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2016


Ada Wai Tung Fung
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Wai-Chi Chan
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Corine Sau-Man Wong
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Eric Yu-Hai Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Roger Man-Kin Ng
Affiliation:
Kowloon Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
Edwin Ho-Ming Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Wing-Chung Chang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Se-Fong Hung
Affiliation:
Kwai Chung Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
Eric Fuk-Chi Cheung
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
Pak-Chung Sham
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Helen Fung-Kum Chiu
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Ming Lam
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
Tin-Po Chiang
Affiliation:
Castle Peak Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China
Jim van Os
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands
Joseph Tak-Fai Lau
Affiliation:
Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Glyn Lewis
Affiliation:
Academic Unit of Psychiatry, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
Paul Bebbington
Affiliation:
Department of Mental Health Sciences, University College London, London, UK
Linda Chiu Wa Lam
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

Anxiety disorders are prevalent yet under-recognized in late life. We examined the prevalence of anxiety disorders in a representative sample of community dwelling older adults in Hong Kong.

Method:

Data on 1,158 non-demented respondents aged 60–75 years were extracted from the Hong Kong Mental Morbidity survey (HKMMS). Anxiety was assessed with the revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R).

Result:

One hundred and thirty-seven respondents (11.9%, 95% CI = 10–13.7%) had common mental disorders with a CIS-R score of 12 or above. 8% (95% CI = 6.5–9.6%) had anxiety, 2.2% (95% CI = 1.3–3%) had an anxiety disorder comorbid with depressive disorder, and 1.7% (95% CI = 1–2.5%) had depression. Anxious individuals were more likely to be females (χ 2 = 25.3, p < 0.001), had higher chronic physical burden (t = −9.3, p < 0.001), lower SF-12 physical functioning score (t = 9.2, p < 0.001), and poorer delayed recall (t = 2.3, p = 0.022). The risk of anxiety was higher for females (OR 2.8, 95% C.I. 1.7–4.6, p < 0.001) and those with physical illnesses (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.3–1.6, p < 0.001). The risk of anxiety disorders increased in those with disorders of cardiovascular (OR 1.9, 95% C.I. 1.2–2.9, p = 0.003), musculoskeletal (OR 2.0, 95% C.I. 1.5–2.7, p < 0.001), and genitourinary system (OR 2.0, 95% C.I. 1.3–3.2, p = 0.002).

Conclusions:

The prevalence of anxiety disorders in Hong Kong older population was 8%. Female gender and those with poor physical health were at a greater risk of developing anxiety disorders. Our findings also suggested potential risk for early sign of memory impairment in cognitively healthy individuals with anxiety disorders.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2016 

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