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Prevalence and correlates of psychotropic drug use in community-dwelling people with young-onset dementia: the NeedYD-study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2014

Raymond T.C.M. Koopmans
Affiliation:
Department of Primary and Community Care, Centre for Family Medicine, Geriatric Care and Public Health, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC), Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Renate Reinders
Affiliation:
Department of Primary and Community Care, Centre for Family Medicine, Geriatric Care and Public Health, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC), Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Deliane van Vliet
Affiliation:
Department of Primary and Community Care, Centre for Family Medicine, Geriatric Care and Public Health, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC), Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Frans R.J. Verhey
Affiliation:
School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Center Limburg, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands
Marjolein E. de Vugt
Affiliation:
School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Alzheimer Center Limburg, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, the Netherlands
Hans Bor
Affiliation:
Department of Primary and Community Care, Centre for Family Medicine, Geriatric Care and Public Health, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC), Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Christian Bakker
Affiliation:
Department of Primary and Community Care, Centre for Family Medicine, Geriatric Care and Public Health, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (RUNMC), Nijmegen, the Netherlands Florence, Mariahoeve, Centre for Specialized Care in Early Onset Dementia, The Hague, the Netherlands
Corresponding

Abstract

Background:

Young-onset dementia (YOD) is defined as dementia that develops before the age of 65 years. The prevalence and type of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in YOD differ from patients with late onset dementia. NPS in dementia patients are often treated with psychotropic drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate psychotropic drug use (PDU) in Dutch community-dwelling YOD patients and the association between age, gender, dementia etiology and severity, symptoms of depression, disease awareness, unmet needs, and type of NPS.

Methods:

Psychotropic drug use in 196 YOD patients was registered. Drugs were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutical Chemical classification. The association between age, gender, dementia type, dementia stage, type of NPS, depressive symptoms, disease awareness, and amount of unmet needs on total PDU was analyzed using binomial logistic regression analysis.

Results:

Fifty-two percent of the patients were prescribed at least one psychotropic drug; 36.2% of patients used one drug, and 12.2% used two different drugs. Antidepressants (36.2%) and antipsychotic drugs (17.3%) were the most frequently prescribed psychotropic drugs. Anti-dementia drugs were prescribed in 51.5% of the patients. Increasing age and moderate to severe depressive symptoms were positively associated with the total use of psychotropic drugs.

Conclusions:

Community-dwelling YOD patients have a high prevalence of PDU. More research is needed to study the association between unmet needs, NPS, and PDU, and psychosocial interventions have to be developed to limit the use of psychotropic drugs in YOD.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2014 

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