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Development and validation of the Greek Severe Impairment Battery (SIB)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2014

Anastasia Konsta
Affiliation:
1st Psychiatric Clinic, Papageorgiou General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Eleni Bonti
Affiliation:
1st Psychiatric Clinic, Papageorgiou General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Eleni Parlapani
Affiliation:
1st Psychiatric Clinic, Papageorgiou General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Loukas Athanasiadis
Affiliation:
1st Psychiatric Clinic, Papageorgiou General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Petros Kechayas
Affiliation:
1st Psychiatric Clinic, Papageorgiou General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Maria Karagiannidou
Affiliation:
3rd Psychiatric Clinic, “AHEPA” University Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Konstantinos Fokas
Affiliation:
1st Psychiatric Clinic, Papageorgiou General Hospital of Thessaloniki, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background:

Most neuropsychological batteries, especially those most often used, are unsuitable for the assessment of patients with severe dementia. The Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) was developed for the evaluation of preserved cognitive functions in these patients. The aim of this study was to formulate a Greek version of the SIB and to conduct a first assessment of its use of patients with mild, moderate, or severe Alzheimer's disease (AD), compared to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE).

Methods:

A convenience sample of 42 dementia patients according to DSM-IV-TR criteria and 23 healthy participants was selected. Patients were assessed twice using a Greek translation of the SIB and the Greek version of MMSE. Patients were divided into three severity groups based on grouped by Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) score and the SIB and MMSE scores were compared.

Results:

The validity of the SIB was confirmed by evaluating the correlation coefficients between the SIB and Greek-MMSE, grouped by CDR, which were found to be significant. Cronbach's α for the total SIB score and each subscale score showed high significance, and the item-total correlation for each subscale was also acceptable. The test-retest correlation for the total SIB score and subscale scores were significant. The total SIB score and subscale scores were examined according to CDR.

Conclusion:

The Greek SIB is reliable and valid in differentiating patients with moderate or severe dementia, whereas MMSE loses sensitivity due to a floor and ceiling effect.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2014 

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Development and validation of the Greek Severe Impairment Battery (SIB)
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