Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-m5bhc Total loading time: 0.246 Render date: 2022-10-07T12:37:11.142Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Contribution of Structural Neuroimaging to the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2005

Mony J. de Leon
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
Antonio Convit
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
Susan DeSanti
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
Maciej Bobinski
Affiliation:
Institute for Basic Research, Staten Island, New York, New York, USA
Ajax E. George
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
Henryk M. Wisniewski
Affiliation:
Institute for Basic Research, Staten Island, New York, New York, USA
Henry Rusinek
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
Roberta Carroll
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, NYU Medical Center, New York, New York, USA
L. A. Saint Louis
Affiliation:
Corinthian Diagnostic Radiology, New York, New York, USA

Abstract

There is compelling evidence for the early involvement of the hippocampal formation in the natural history of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The evidence comes from recent neuropathology, neuropsychology, and neuroimaging studies. AD-type histopathologic changes limited to the hippocampus have been described and may be seen in normal aging subjects. The sites of maximal neuronal loss in the hippocampal formation are in the CA1, subiculum, and entorhinal cortex. Minimally cognitively impaired (MCI) individuals (defined by ratings of functional capacity and psychiatric symptomatology) exhibit a neuropsychological profile that is distinct from that of the unimpaired elderly. Pathologic evidence suggests that most of these cases already have AD brain changes accentuated in the hippocampal region, and our own longitudinal studies reveal that 70% of this group develop dementia within a 4-year period. We have developed a negative-angle axial view designed to cut parallel to the anterior-posterior plane of the hippocampus. Using this modified axial plane of section in conjunction with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we estimated the prevalence of hippocampal atrophy in normal aging and across severity levels of cognitively impaired elderly patients. Longitudinal study shows that hippocompal atrophy is a sensitive and specific predictor of future AD for patients with MCI. MRI volume study of AD patients, controls, and MCI patients shows specific hippocampal volume loss in MCI. We conclude that the atrophic changes associated with early AD can be visualized using qualitative techniques and are readily quantifiable with volumetry. This article is not intended to be comprehensive, but to provide an overview of some of the structural neuroimaging data from our laboratory.

Type
Neuroimaging and Electrophysiology
Copyright
© 1997 International Psychogeriatric Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
46
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Contribution of Structural Neuroimaging to the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Contribution of Structural Neuroimaging to the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Contribution of Structural Neuroimaging to the Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *