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Child sexual abuse and health outcomes in the Chinese context

  • Ko Ling Chan (a1), Elsie Yan (a1), Daniel Y. T. Fong (a2), Agnes Tiwari (a2) and Wing Cheong Leung (a3)...

Extract

Reported rates of child sexual abuse in China fall at the lower end of the range found in Western studies. However, most of the studies were conducted in only one city or province and thus their results may not be generalisable. Acknowledging the infeasibility of recruiting a truly representative sample, we conducted a survey during 2009–10 using a probability sampling procedure to obtain a large and diverse sample of school-aged adolescents from six regions in China. About one in every 13 children had had experience of sexual abuse. Routine screening in medical and social settings is urged. Efforts should be made to ensure wide awareness of this issue.

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This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.

References

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Child sexual abuse and health outcomes in the Chinese context

  • Ko Ling Chan (a1), Elsie Yan (a1), Daniel Y. T. Fong (a2), Agnes Tiwari (a2) and Wing Cheong Leung (a3)...

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Child sexual abuse and health outcomes in the Chinese context

  • Ko Ling Chan (a1), Elsie Yan (a1), Daniel Y. T. Fong (a2), Agnes Tiwari (a2) and Wing Cheong Leung (a3)...
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