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Investigations into phlebotomine sandflies in the Nairobi area

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2011

R. O. Maranga
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197, Nairobi, Kenya
L. W. Irungu
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 30197, Nairobi, Kenya
M. J. Mutinga
Affiliation:
International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, P. O. Box 30772 Nairobi, Kenya

Abstract

Studies were commenced to collect and identify the phlebotomine sandflies found in Nairobi. These studies were also aimed at determining their numbers as well as assessing the effects of seasonal changes on the sandfly population. Four trapping methods, namely, light traps, sticky traps, aspiration and human bait were employed. Eight species and one undescribed species were recorded over a period of 6 months. The identified species included Phlebotomus guggisbergi (Kirk and Lewis), P. rodhaini (Parrot), Sergentomyia adleri (Theodor), S. harveyi (Heisch, Guggisberg and Teesdale) and S. bedfordi (Newstead) and an undescribed species. Most of the sandfly species trapped showed seasonal prevalence. The seasonal variation was closely related to the weather conditions. Sandflies were found in termite mounds, animal burrows, caves and dugouts some of which were near human habitations. Termite mounds and animal burrows were the most preferred habitats.

Résumé

Des études ont étè entreprises a fin de réunir et d'identifier les mouches des sables phlebotomine trouvées a Nairobi. Ces études visaient oussi a deteminer leur nombre ainsi qua établir les effets des changements saisonniers la population des mouches des sables. Quatre méthodes de pièges, lumière, glu, aspiration et appât humain ont et employés. Huit espèces at une espèce non décrites ont étè répertoriées pendant une période de six mois. Les espèces identifiées incluaient Phlebotomus guggisbergi (Kirk and Lewis), P. rodhaini (Parrot), Sergentomyia adleri (Theodor), S. squamipleuris (Newstead), S. clydei (Sinton), S. teesdalei (Minter), S. harveyi (Heisch, Guggisberg and Teesdale) and S. bedfordi (Newstead) et une espèce non décrite. La plupart des espèces piegées montraient une prédominanu saissonniér. La variation saisonniére était intiment liée aux conditions météorologues. Des mouches des stables furent trouvées, quelque uns pres d'habitations humaines. Termitiéres et terriers étaient les habitats préféres.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © ICIPE 1994

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