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Technology on probation

  • Gert J. van der Wilt (a1)

Extract

One of the key tasks of governments and their advisory bodies is to decide what the nature and quality of the evidence should be which they use to support their policies. Evidence, as pointed out by Valerie Miké, is inherently incomplete, provisional, and subject to refutation (4). So when are we justified to presume sufficient value of a healthcare technology, warranting its public provision and funding?

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References

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1. Chafe, R, Laupacis, A, Levinson, W, Merali, F, Martin, D. Does the public think it is reasonable to wait for more evidence before funding innovative health technologies? The case of PET scanning in Ontario. Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 2010;26:192197.
2. Coates, J. Why public participation is essential in technology assessment. Publ Adm Rev. 1975;35:6769.
3. Esarey, J. Bayesian statistical decision theory and a critical test for substantive significance. Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, Toronto; 2009. http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1450040.
4. Miké, V. Seeking the truth in a world of chance. Technol Soc. 2000;22:353360.
5. Smith, G, Wales, C. Citizens' juries and deliberative democracy. Polit Stud. 2000;48:5165.

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