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Health technology assessment and its influence on health-care priority setting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 April 2004

Adam Oliver
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Elias Mossialos
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Ray Robinson
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science

Abstract

In this article, we review the development of health technology assessment (HTA) in England and Wales, France, The Netherlands, and Sweden, and we summarize the reaction to these developments from a variety of different disciplinary and stakeholder perspectives (political science, sociology, economics, ethics, public health, general practice, clinical medicine, patients, and the pharmaceutical industry). We conclude that translating HTA into policy is a highly complex business and that, despite the growth of HTA over the past two decades, its influence on policy making, and its perceived relevance for people from a broad range of different perspectives, remains marginal.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2004 Cambridge University Press

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