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Information Literacy in a Fake/False News World: Why Does it Matter and How Does it Spread?

  • Kristina L. Niedringhaus

Extract

Now that we have a better understanding of the history and context of fake news, I am going to discuss why fake news and combatting it matters and how the recent rise of fake news correlates with a change in how society views expertise. I will also share the recently released results of a huge research project examining how fake news spreads.

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Copyright

Footnotes

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2

The author is the Associate Dean for Library & Information Resources and Associate Professor, Georgia State University College of Law Library.

Footnotes

References

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3 Carol A. Watson, Information Literacy in a Fake/False News World: An Overview of the Characteristics of Fake News and its Historical Development, https://doi.org/10.1017/jli.2018.25.

4 Wolfe, Robert M. & Sharp, Lisa K., Anti-vaccinationists past and present, British Medical Journal, pp. 430–2, August 24, 2002. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1123944/.

5 Wakefield, A. J., Murch, S. H., Anthony, A., Linnell, J., Casson, D. M., Malik, M., et al. Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. Lancet. 1998; 351: 637–41. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9500320.

6 S. H., Murch, Anthony, A., Casson, D. H., Malik, M., Berelowitz, M., Dhillon, A. P. et al. Retraction of an interpretation. Lancet. 2004; 363: 750. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15016483.

7 Editors. Retraction-Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, nonspecific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. Lancet. 2010; 375: 445. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20137807; Laura Eggertson, Lancet retracts twelve-year-old article linking autism to MMR vaccines. Canadian Medical Association Journal. March 9, 2010, 182(4), E199–200. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831678/.

8 Carrel, Margaret & Bitterman, Patrick, Personal Belief Exemptions to Vaccination in California: A Spatial Analysis. Pediatrics. June 2015, 80(1), pp. 80–8. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/136/1/80.full.pdf.

9 Nyhan, Brendan et al. , Effective Messages in Vaccine Promotion: A Randomized Trial, Pediatrics, 133(4), pp. 18, http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/early/2014/02/25/peds.2013-2365.full.pdf.

10 One example is data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, https://www.climate.gov/news-features/understanding-climate/climate-change-global-temperature.

15 Online fake news and hate speech are fueling tribal ‘genocide’ in South Sudan, https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-04-25/online-fake-news-and-hate-speech-are-fueling-tribal-genocide-south-sudan.

16 Oxford University Press (2017).

17 Ibid., preface.

21 Soroush Vosoughi, Deb Roy, and Sinan Aral, The spread of true and false news online, 359 Science 1146–51, http://science.sciencemag.org/content/359/6380/1146.full.

This is the updated text of a presentation delivered on October 25, 2017 at the International Association of Law Libraries, 36th Annual Course on International Law and Legal Information, Civil Rights, Human Rights, and Other Critical Issues in U.S. Law, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, October 22–26, 2017.

2 The author is the Associate Dean for Library & Information Resources and Associate Professor, Georgia State University College of Law Library.

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