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Piloting a Quality Improvement Intervention for Urinary Catheter Removal to Reduce Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in a Medical Intensive Care Unit

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 November 2020

Dinh Thi Thu Huong
Affiliation:
National Hospital of Tropical Diseases
Ha Quang Doan
Affiliation:
National hospital of Tropical Diseases
Phu Dinh Vu
Affiliation:
National hospital of Tropical Diseases
Nga Nguyen
Affiliation:
PATH
Vasquez Amber
Affiliation:
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Ha Tran Thi Thu
Affiliation:
PATH
Lan Nguyen Thi Phong
Affiliation:
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Unarose Hogan
Affiliation:
PATH, Hanoi, Viet Nam
Lien Thi Le
Affiliation:
National hospital of Tropical Diseases
Trang Thi Nguyen
Affiliation:
National Hospital Tropical Diseases, Hanoi, Viet Nam
Thuong Thi Nguyen
Affiliation:
National Hospital Tropical Diseases, Hanoi, Viet Nam
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Abstract

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Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most prevalent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) globally, contributing to increased morbidity, prolonged hospital stays, and increased healthcare costs. Interventions that support prompt removal of the urinary catheter are evidence-based actions to effectively reduce CAUTI rates.1Objective: At the National Hospital of Tropical Disease (NHTD), catheter removal interventions in the intensive care unit (ICU) were implemented using quality improvement (QI) methodology to reduce CAUTI incidence and urinary catheter device utilization. Methods: Training was performed for ICU clinical staff with knowledge checks before and after the program. A bedside visual reminder of CAUTI risk and checklist to assess catheter need were implemented. Weekly compliance of provided visual reminders and checklists were measured using a simple audit tool. Device utilization ratios (DURs, ratios of device days to patient days), and CAUTI incidence rates (per 1,000 device days) were collected at baseline (July–September 2018) and quarterly thereafter until June 2019. Statistical significance was determined by an independent t test. Results: In the first quarter (October–December 2018), the CAUTI incidence rate decreased from 8.9 to 1.3 per 1,000 device days (P = .036). The ICU staff trained in CAUTI prevention, mean knowledge scores before and after training increased from 68% to 87%. The DUR decreased slightly from 0.59 to 0.55 after the first-quarter training then steadily increased in the following quarter (0.60; January–March 2019) and after the intervention (0.54; April–June 2019). CAUTI incidence rates also increased but were still lower than at baseline: 4.8 and 6.3 per 1,000 days of device use. Compliance of reminders was 51% during the first quarter, increased slightly in the second quarter 62%, then decreased to 40% during the last quarter. The nurses’ adherence to the daily checklist remained stable (>75%). Conclusions: This CAUTI prevention project was the first use of quality improvement methodology to implement change at NHTD. A trend decrease in CAUTI was observed, though a greater decrease occurred at the beginning of the intervention. Limited compliance of daily reminders is likely reflected in no statistically significant decrease in DUR. Possibly, this quality improvement project raised awareness among clinicians to improve general CAUTI prevention practices in the ICU without decreasing DUR. Given limited compliance with reminder and checklists, the intervention will be revised during the next PDSA cycle to improve adherence.

1Meddings J, Rogers MA, Krein SL, Fakih MG, Olmsted RN, Saint S. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review. BMJ Qual Saf 2014;23:277–289.

Funding: None

Disclosures: None

Type
Poster Presentations
Copyright
© 2020 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved.
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Piloting a Quality Improvement Intervention for Urinary Catheter Removal to Reduce Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in a Medical Intensive Care Unit
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