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Lack of Evidence for Attributing Chlorhexidine as the Main Active Ingredient in Skin Antiseptics Preventing Surgical Site Infections

  • Matthias Maiwald (a1), Andreas F. Widmer (a2) and Manfred L. Rotter (a3)
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      Lack of Evidence for Attributing Chlorhexidine as the Main Active Ingredient in Skin Antiseptics Preventing Surgical Site Infections
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      Lack of Evidence for Attributing Chlorhexidine as the Main Active Ingredient in Skin Antiseptics Preventing Surgical Site Infections
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Abstract

Copyright

Corresponding author

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, 100 Bukit Timah Road, Singapore 229899, Singapore (matthias.maiwald@kkh.com.sg)

References

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1. Noorani, A, Rabey, N, Walsh, SR, Davies, RJ. Systematic review and meta-analysis of preoperative antisepsis with Chlorhexidine versus povidone-iodine in clean-contaminated surgery. Br J Surg 2010;97:16141620.
2. Lee, I, Agarwal, RK, Lee, BY, Fishman, NO, Umscheid, CA. Systematic review and cost analysis comparing use of Chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis to prevent surgical site infection. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31:12191229.
3. Gröschel, DHM, Pruett, TL. Surgical antisepsis. In: Block, SS, ed. Disinfection, Sterilization and Preservation. 4th ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1991:642654.
4. Rotter, ML. Hand washing, hand disinfection, and skin disinfection. In: Wenzel, RP, ed. Prevention and Control of Nosocomial Infections. 3rd ed. Baltimore: Williams & Willems, 1997:691709.
5. Rotter, ML. Hand washing and hand disinfection. In: Mayhall, CG, ed. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2004:17271746.
6. Mangram, AJ, Horan, TC, Pearson, ML, Silver, LC, Jarvis, WR, Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guideline for prevention of surgical site infection, 1999. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1999;20:250278.
7. Maiwald, M, Widmer, AF, Rotter, ML. Chlorhexidine is not the main active ingredient in skin antiseptics that reduce blood culture contamination rates. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31:10951096.
8. Darouiche, RO, Wall, MJ Jr, Itani, KM, et al. Chlorhexidine-alcohol versus povidone-iodine for surgical-site antisepsis. N Engl J Med 2010;362:1826.
9. Kampf, G, Shaffer, M, Hunte, C. Insufficient neutralization in testing a chlorhexidine-containing ethanol-based hand rub can result in a false positive efficacy assessment. BMC Infect Dis 2005;5:48.
10. Swenson, BR, Hedrick, TL, Metzger, R, Bonatti, H, Pruett, TL, Sawyer, RG. Effects of preoperative skin preparation on postoperative wound infection rates: a prospective study of 3 skin preparation protocols. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2009;30:964971.

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