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Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination: How Far We Have Come and How to Go Farther

  • Henry M. Wu (a1) (a2) and Elias Abrutyn (a1) (a2)
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Copyright

Corresponding author

Drexel University College of Medicine, 245 N. 15th Street, Mail Stop 461, Philadelphia, PA 19102

References

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6. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination coverage levels among persons aged > or = 65 years: United States, 1973-1993. MMWR 1995;44:506-507, 513505.
7. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination levels among persons aged > or = 65 years: United States, 2001. MMWR 2002;51:10191024.
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10. Bryant, KA, Stover, B, Cain, L, Levine, GL, Siegel, J, Jarvis, WR. Improving influenza immunization rates among healthcare workers caring for high-risk pediatric patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2004;25:912917.
11. Sartor, C, Tissot-Dupont, H, Zandotti, C, Martin, F, Roques, P, Drancourt, M. Use of a mobile cart influenza program for vaccination of hospital employees. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2004;25:918922.
12. Salgado, CD, Giannetta, ET, Hayden, FG, Farr, BM. Preventing nosocomial influenza by improving the vaccine acceptance rate of clinicians. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2004;25:923928.
13. Fedson, DS, Houck, P, Bratzler, D. Hospital-based influenza and pneumococcal vaccination: Sutton's Law applied to prevention. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2000;21:692699.
14. Salgado, CD, Farr, BM, Hall, KK, Hayden, FG. Influenza in the acute hospital setting. Lancet Infect Dis 2002;2:145155.
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18. Grassia, T. Price of FluMist slashed, partnership announced. Infectious Disease News. August 2004:1415.

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