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Susceptibility of Candida auris and Candida albicans to 21 germicides used in healthcare facilities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2019

William A. Rutala*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
Hajime Kanamori
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States Department of Infection Control and Laboratory Diagnostics, Internal Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Maria F. Gergen
Affiliation:
Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
Emily E. Sickbert-Bennett
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
David J. Weber
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States Department of Hospital Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Health Care, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
*
Author for correspondence: William A. Rutala, Email: brutala@med.unc.edu

Extract

Candida auris is an emerging fungal pathogen that is often resistant to major classes of antifungal drugs. It is considered a serious global health threat because it can cause severe infections with frequent mortality in more than a dozen countries. It can survive on healthcare environmental surfaces for at least 7 days and can cause outbreaks in healthcare facilities. Clearly, infection prevention strategies, such as surface disinfection, will be essential to controlling Candida transmission. Unfortunately, data on the activity of antiseptics and disinfectants used in healthcare to inactivate this pathogen are limited.15 In this study, we investigated 12 different disinfectants (ie, 8 low- and intermediate-level disinfectants in 2 dilutions of sodium hypochlorite and 5 high-level disinfectants/chemical sterilants) and 9 antiseptics commonly used in healthcare facilities for their antimicrobial activity against C. auris and C. albicans.

Type
Research Brief
Copyright
© 2019 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved. 

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Footnotes

PREVIOUS PRESENTATION. This work was presented in part as a poster (no. 483) at IDWeek 2017 on October 5, 2017, in San Diego, California.

References

Vallabhaneni, S, Kallen, A, Tsay, S, et al. Investigation of the first seven reported cases of Candida auris, a globally emerging invasive, multidrug-resistant fungus—United States, May 2013–August 2016. Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:12341237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schelenz, S, Hagen, F, Rhodes, JL, et al. First hospital outbreak of the globally emerging Candida auris in a European hospital. Antimicrob Resist Infect Control 2016;5:35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Biswal, M, Rudramurthy, SM, Jain, N, et al. Controlling a possible outbreak of Candida auris infection: lessons learnt from multiple interventions. J Hosp Infect 2017;97:363370.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cadnum, JC, Shaikh, AA, Piedrahita, CT, et al. Effectiveness of disinfectants against Candida auris and other Candida species. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1240–3.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Piedrahita, CT, Cadnum, JC, Jencson, AL, Shaikh, AA, Ghannoum, MA, Donskey, CJ. Environmental surfaces in healthcare facilities are a potential source for transmission of Candida auris and other Candida species. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:11071109.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sattar, SA, Springthorpe, VS, Adegbunrin, O, Zafer, AA, Busa, M. A disc-based quantitative carrier test method to assess the virucidal activity of chemical germicides. J Virol Methods 2003;112:312.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rutala, WA, Peacock, JE, Gergen, MF, Sobsey, MD, Weber, DJ. Efficacy of hospital germicides against adenovirus 8, a common cause of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis in health care facilities. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2006;50:14191424.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Recommendations for infection prevention and control for Candida auris. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/candida-auris/c-auris-infection-control.html. Updated 2018. Accessed September 26, 2018.Google Scholar
Kanamori, H, Rutala, WA, Weber, DJ, Gergen, MF, Sickbert-Bennett, EE, Weber, DJ. Germicidal activity against carbapenem/colistin resistant Enterobacteriaceae using a quantitative carrier test method. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2018;62:e0031818. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00318-18.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cadnum, JL, Shaikh, AA, Piedrahita, CT, et al. Relative resistance of the emerging fungal pathogen Candida auris and other Candida species to killing by ultraviolet light. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:9496.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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