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Real-world implementation and impact of a rapid carbapenemase detection test in an area endemic for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2021

Alex M. Trzebucki*
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York
Lars F. Westblade
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York
Angela Loo
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
Shawn Mazur
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmacy, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
Stephen G. Jenkins
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York
David P. Calfee
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York Department of Infection Prevention and Control, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
Michael J. Satlin
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York
Matthew S. Simon
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York Department of Infection Prevention and Control, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York
*
Author for correspondence: Alex M. Trzebucki, E-mail: trzebucki@gmail.com

Abstract

A retrospective study was conducted to describe the impact of a molecular assay to detect the most common carbapenemase genes in carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales isolates recovered in culture. Carbapenemases were detected in 69% of isolates, and assay results guided treatment modifications or epidemiologic investigation in 20% and 4% of cases, respectively.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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References

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Trzebucki et al. supplementary material

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Real-world implementation and impact of a rapid carbapenemase detection test in an area endemic for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacterales
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