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Pseudo-Outbreak of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Associated With Contamination of a Semiautomatic Cap Remover

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 June 2016

Bram M. W. Diederen*
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, The Netherlands
Carlo Verhulst
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Microbiology and Infection Control, Amphia Hospital, Breda, The Netherlands
Annemarie van't Veen
Affiliation:
Department of Virology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Peter H. J. van Keulen
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Microbiology and Infection Control, Amphia Hospital, Breda, The Netherlands
Jan A. J. W. Kluytmans
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Microbiology and Infection Control, Amphia Hospital, Breda, The Netherlands
*
Laboratory of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, St. Elisabeth Hospital, PO Box 747, 5000 AS Tilburg, The Netherlands (b.diederen@elisabeth.nl)

Abstract

A pseudo-outbreak of hepatitis B virus caused by cross-contamination from a semiautomatic cap remover for blood collection tubes is reported. The source of the outbreak was elucidated by using basic epidemiological methods. Laboratories should always be critical about their results in order to identify contamination problems.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2006

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