Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-27v8q Total loading time: 0.163 Render date: 2022-11-28T22:09:04.144Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Prevalence of Rectal Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae among International Patients Hospitalized at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2016

Shawn Vasoo
Affiliation:
Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Theresa Madigan
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Scott A. Cunningham
Affiliation:
Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Jayawant N. Mandrekar
Affiliation:
Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Stephen B. Porter
Affiliation:
Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Brian Johnston
Affiliation:
Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Priya Sampathkumar
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Pritish K. Tosh
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
James R. Johnson
Affiliation:
Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Robin Patel
Affiliation:
Division of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Ritu Banerjee*
Affiliation:
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
*
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905 (banerjee.ritu@mayo.edu)

Abstract

Rectal colonization with multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae was found in 23 of 94 consecutively enrolled international patients hospitalized at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. No carbapenemase producers were detected. Twenty-one isolates were extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. Colonization was associated with gastrointestinal disease and central venous catheter placement within the antecedent year.

Type
Concise Communication
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health Alert Network. CDC Health Advisory: New Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Warrant Additional Action by Healthcare Providers. Atlanta: CDC, 2013. http://www.bt.cdc.gov/HAN/han00341.asp. Accessed March 6, 2013.Google Scholar
2. Vasoo, S, Cunningham, SA, Kohner, PC, Lolans, K, Hayden, MK, Patel, R. Rapid and direct real-time detection of bla KPC and bla NDM from surveillance samples. J Clin Microbiol 2013;51:36093615.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3. Magiorakos, AP, Srinivasan, A, Carey, RB, et al. Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance. Clin Microbiol Infect 2012;18:268281.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Johnson, JR, Urban, C, Weissman, SJ, et al. Molecular epidemiological analysis of Escherichia coli sequence type ST131 (025: H4) and blaCTX-M-15 among extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing E. coli from the United States, 2000 to 2009. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2012;56:23642370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Weissman, SJ, Johnson, JR, Tchesnokova, V, et al. High-resolution two-locus clonal typing of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli . Appl Environ Microbiol 2012;78:13531360.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6. Pitout, JD, Campbell, L, Church, DL, Gregson, DB, Laupland, KB. Molecular characteristics of travel-related extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates from the Calgary Health Region. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2009;53:25392543.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae containing New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase in two patients-Rhode Island, March 2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2012;61:446448.Google ScholarPubMed
8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Notes from the field: hospital outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase- Denver, Colorado, 2012. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2012; 62:108.Google Scholar
9. Lowe, CF, Kus, JV, Salt, N, et al. Nosocomial transmission of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Toronto, Canada. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2013; 34:4955.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10. Gardam, MA, Burrows, LL, Kus, JV, et al. Is surveillance for multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae an effective infection control strategy in the absence of an outbreak? J Infect Dis 2002; 186: 17541760.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11. Lowe, CF, Katz, K, McGeer, AJ, Muller, MP. Efficacy of admission screening for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae. PLoS One 2013;8:e62678.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12. Jamal, W, Rotimi, VO, Albert, MJ, Khodakhast, F, Udo, EE, Poirel, L. Emergence of nosocomial New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Kuwait. Int J Antimicrob Agents 2012;39:183184.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Prevalence of Rectal Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae among International Patients Hospitalized at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Prevalence of Rectal Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae among International Patients Hospitalized at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Prevalence of Rectal Colonization with Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae among International Patients Hospitalized at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *