Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-78dcdb465f-9mfzn Total loading time: 26.369 Render date: 2021-04-15T12:14:08.123Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Decontamination in a Patient Room Using Feline Calicivirus and Murine Norovirus as Surrogate Markers for Human Norovirus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2016

Torsten Holmdahl
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital SUS, Malmö, Sweden
Mats Walder
Affiliation:
Medical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital SUS, Malmö, Sweden
Nathalie Uzcátegui
Affiliation:
Scandinavian Micro Biodevices, Farum, Denmark
Inga Odenholt
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital SUS, Malmö, Sweden
Peter Lanbeck
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital SUS, Malmö, Sweden
Patrik Medstrand
Affiliation:
Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden
Anders Widell
Affiliation:
Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) could be used to decontaminate caliciviruses from surfaces in a patient room.

DESIGN

Feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) were used as surrogate viability markers to mimic the noncultivable human norovirus. Cell culture supernatants of FCV and MNV were dried in triplicate 35-mm wells of 6-well plastic plates. These plates were placed in various positions in a nonoccupied patient room that was subsequently exposed to HPV. Control plates were positioned in a similar room but were never exposed to HPV.

METHODS

Virucidal activity was measured in cell culture by reduction in 50% tissue culture infective dose titer for FCV and by both 50% tissue culture infective dose titer and plaque reduction for MNV.

RESULTS

Neither viable FCV nor viable MNV could be detected in the test room after HPV treatment. At least 3.65 log reduction for FCV and at least 3.67 log reduction for MNV were found by 50% tissue culture infective dose. With plaque assay, measurable reduction for MNV was at least 2.85 log units.

CONCLUSIONS

The successful inactivation of both surrogate viruses indicates that HPV could be a useful tool for surface decontamination of a patient room contaminated by norovirus. Hence nosocomial spread to subsequent patients can be avoided.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:561–566

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
© 2016 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Evans, MR, Meldrum, R, Lane, W, et al. An outbreak of viral gastroenteritis following environmental contamination at a concert hall. Epidemiol Infect 2002;129:355360.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Marks, PJ, Vipond, IB, Regan, FM, Wedgwood, K, Fey, RE, Caul, EO. A school outbreak of Norwalk-like virus: evidence for airborne transmission. Epidemiol Infect 2003;131:727736.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Marks, PJ, Vipond, IB, Carlisle, D, Deakin, D, Fey, RE, Caul, EO. Evidence for airborne transmission of Norwalk-like virus (NLV) in a hotel restaurant. Epidemiol Infect 2000;124:481487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Nenonen, NP, Hannoun, C, Svensson, L, et al. Norovirus GII.4 detection in environmental samples from patient rooms during nosocomial outbreaks. J Clin Microbiol 2014;52:23522358.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Nenonen, NP, Hannoun, C, Larsson, CU, Bergström, T. Marked genomic diversity of norovirus genogroup I strains in a waterborne outbreak. Appl Environ Microbiol 2012;78:18461852.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. de Wit, MA, Widdowson, MA, Vennema, H, de Bruin, E, Fernandes, T, Koopmans, M. Large outbreak of norovirus: the baker who should have known better. J Infect 2007;55:188193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Hall, AJ, Eisenbart, VG, Etingüe, AL, Gould, LH, Lopman, BA, Parashar, UD. Epidemiology of foodborne norovirus outbreaks, United States, 2001-2008. Emerg Infect Dis 2012;18:15661573.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Boone, SA, Gerba, CP. Significance of fomites in the spread of respiratory and enteric viral disease. Appl Environ Microbiol 2007;73:16871689.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Poschetto, LF, Ike, A, Papp, T, Mohn, U, Böhm, R, Marschang, RE. Comparison of the sensitivities of noroviruses and feline calicivirus to chemical disinfection under field-like conditions. Appl Environ Microbiol 2007;73:54945500.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Duizer, E, Bijkerk, P, Rockx, B, De Groot, A, Twisk, F, Koopmans, M. Inactivation of caliciviruses. Appl Environ Microbiol 2004;70:45384543.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11. Wobus, CE, Thackray, LB, Virgin, HW 4th. Murine norovirus: a model system to study norovirus biology and pathogenesis. J Virol 2006;80:51045112.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12. Tuladhar, E, Terpstra, P, Koopmans, M, Duizer, E. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection. J Hosp Infect 2012;80:110115.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13. Barker, J, Vipond, IB, Bloomfield, SF. Effects of cleaning and disinfection in reducing the spread of norovirus contamination via environmental surfaces. J Hosp Infect 2004;58:4249.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
14. Holmdahl, T, Lanbeck, P, Wullt, M, Walder, MH. A head-to-head comparison of hydrogen peroxide vapor and aerosol room decontamination systems. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2011;32:831836.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15. Bartels, MD, Kristoffersen, K, Slotsbjerg, T, Rohde, SM, Lundgren, B, Westh, H. Environmental meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) disinfection using dry-mist-generated hydrogen peroxide. J Hosp Infect 2008;70:3541.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16. Passaretti, CL, Otter, JA, Reich, NG, et al. An evaluation of environmental decontamination with hydrogen peroxide vapor for reducing the risk of patient acquisition of multidrug-resistant organisms. Clin Infect Dis 2013;56:2735.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
17. Falagas, ME, Thomaidis, PC, Kotsantis, IK, Sgouros, K, Samonis, G, Karageorgopoulos, DE. Airborne hydrogen peroxide for disinfection of the hospital environment and infection control: a systematic review. J Hosp Infect 2011;78:171177.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
18. Boyce, JM, Havill, NL, Otter, JA, et al. Impact of hydrogen peroxide vapor room decontamination on Clostridium difficile environmental contamination and transmission in a healthcare setting. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008;29:723729.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Barbut, F, Yezli, S, Mimoun, M, Pham, J, Chaouat, M, Otter, JA. Reducing the spread of Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on a burns unit through the intervention of an infection control bundle. Burns 2013;39:395403.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
20. Manian, FA, Griesnauer, S, Bryant, A. Implementation of hospital-wide enhanced terminal cleaning of targeted patient rooms and its impact on endemic Clostridium difficile infection rates. Am J Infect Control 2013;41:537541.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21. Otter, JA, Yezli, S, Schouten, MA, van Zanten, AR, Houmes-Zielman, G, Nohlmans-Paulssen, MK. Hydrogen peroxide vapor decontamination of an intensive care unit to remove environmental reservoirs of multidrug-resistant gram-negative rods during an outbreak. Am J Infect Control 2010;38:754756.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
22. Ray, A, Perez, F, Beltramini, AM, et al. Use of vaporized hydrogen peroxide decontamination during an outbreak of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection at a long-term acute care hospital. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2010;31:12361241.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23. Li, D, Baert, L, Uyttendaele, M. Inactivation of food-borne viruses using natural biochemical substances. Food Microbiol 2013;35:19.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
24. Bentley, K, Dove, BK, Parks, SR, Walker, JT, Bennett, AM. Hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination of surfaces artificially contaminated with norovirus surrogate feline calicivirus. J Hosp Infect 2012;80:116121.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25. Goyal, SM, Chander, Y, Yezli, S, Otter, JA. Evaluating the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour. J Hosp Infect 2014;86:255259.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
26. Reed, LJ, Muench, H. A simple method of estimating fifty percent endpoints. Am J Hyg 1938:493497.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 23
Total number of PDF views: 144 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 15th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Decontamination in a Patient Room Using Feline Calicivirus and Murine Norovirus as Surrogate Markers for Human Norovirus
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Decontamination in a Patient Room Using Feline Calicivirus and Murine Norovirus as Surrogate Markers for Human Norovirus
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Decontamination in a Patient Room Using Feline Calicivirus and Murine Norovirus as Surrogate Markers for Human Norovirus
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *