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Healthcare Personnel Perceptions of Hand Hygiene Monitoring Technology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Katherine Ellingson*
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Philip M. Polgreen
Affiliation:
Computational Epidemiology Group, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Amy Schneider
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Laura Shinkunas
Affiliation:
Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Lauris C. Kaldjian
Affiliation:
Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Donald Wright
Affiliation:
Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC
Geb W. Thomas
Affiliation:
Computational Epidemiology Group, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Alberto M. Segre
Affiliation:
Computational Epidemiology Group, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa Department of Computer Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Ted Herman
Affiliation:
Computational Epidemiology Group, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa Department of Computer Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
L. Clifford McDonald
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
Ronda Sinkowitz-Cochran
Affiliation:
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
*
Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, MS A-31, Atlanta, GA30333 (kellingson@cdc.gov)

Abstract

Objective.

To assess healthcare personnel (HCP) perceptions regarding implementation of sensor-based electronic systems for automated hand hygiene adherence monitoring.

Design.

Using a mixed-methods approach, structured focus groups were designed to elicit quantitative and qualitative responses on familiarity, comfort level, and perceived impact of sensor-based hand hygiene adherence monitoring

Setting.

A university hospital, a Veterans Affairs hospital, and a community hospital in the Midwest.

Participants.

Focus groups were homogenous by HCP type, with separate groups held for leadership, midlevel management, and frontline personnel at each hospital.

Results.

Overall, 89 HCP participated in 10 focus groups. Levels of familiarity and comfort with electronic oversight technology varied by HCP type; when compared with frontline HCP, those in leadership positions were significantly more familiar with (P<.01) and more comfortable with (P<.01) the technology. The most common concerns cited by participants across groups included lack of accuracy in the data produced, such as the inability of the technology to assess the situational context of hand hygiene opportunities, and the potential punitive use of data produced. Across groups, HCP had decreased tolerance for electronic collection of spatial-temporal data, describing such oversight as Big Brother.

Conclusions.

While substantial concerns were expressed by all types of HCP, participants' recommendations for effective implementation of electronic oversight technologies for hand hygiene monitoring included addressing accuracy issues before implementation and transparent communication with frontline HCP about the intended use of the data.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2011

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