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Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing and Other Infection Control Practices on the Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown (BUGG) Trial: A Subgroup Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2015

Daniel J. Morgan
Affiliation:
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, Maryland
Lisa Pineles
Affiliation:
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Michelle Shardell
Affiliation:
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
Carol Sulis
Affiliation:
Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
Daniel H. Kett
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida
Jason Bowling
Affiliation:
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University Health System, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas
Beverly M. Belton
Affiliation:
Yale New Haven Health System-Center for Healthcare Solutions, New Haven, Connecticut. Members of the study group are listed at the end of the text
Anthony D. Harris
Affiliation:
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, Maryland

Abstract

We report the results of a subgroup analysis of the Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown trial. In 20 intensive care units, the reduction in acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus observed in this trial was observed in units also using chlorhexidine bathing and in those that previously performed active surveillance.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2015;00(0): 1–4

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2015 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

1. Klevens, RM, Edwards, JR, Richards, CL Jr, et al. Estimating health care-associated infections and deaths in U.S. hospitals, 2002. Public Health Rep 2007;122:160166.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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5. Milstone, AM, Elward, A, Song, X, et al. Daily chlorhexidine bathing to reduce bacteraemia in critically ill children: a multicentre, cluster-randomised, crossover trial. Lancet 2013;381:10991106.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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8. Edmond, MB, Wenzel, RP.. Targeted decolonization to prevent ICU infections. N Engl J Med 2013;369:1471.Google ScholarPubMed
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Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing and Other Infection Control Practices on the Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown (BUGG) Trial: A Subgroup Analysis
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Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing and Other Infection Control Practices on the Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown (BUGG) Trial: A Subgroup Analysis
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Effect of Chlorhexidine Bathing and Other Infection Control Practices on the Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown (BUGG) Trial: A Subgroup Analysis
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