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Effect of Building Construction on Aspergillus Concentrations in a Hospital

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Marian D. Goebes*
Affiliation:
Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford
Ellen Jo Baron
Affiliation:
Clinical Microbiology, Virology, Mycology and Parasitology, Stanford University, Stanford
Kathleen L. Mathews
Affiliation:
Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Infection Control, Palo Alto, California
Lynn M. Hildemann
Affiliation:
Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford
*
Civil and Environmental Engineering, Environment and Energy Building-4020, 473 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA 94305, (mdgoebes@gmail.com)

Abstract

Air samples taken in a hospital undergoing construction and analyzed with a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the Aspergillus genus did not show elevated concentrations of Aspergillus or particulate matter with a diameter of 5 μm or less in patient areas. Air samples from the construction zone indicated the containment system, which used polyethylene film barrier and negative pressure, was effective.

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2008

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