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Core Components for Infection Prevention and Control Programs: A World Health Organization Network Report

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2015

Wing Hong Seto*
Affiliation:
Department of Quality and Risk Management, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong
Fernando Otaíza
Affiliation:
Ministry of Health of Chile, Quality and Safety of Health Care, Santiago, Chile
Carmen L. Pessoa-Silva
Affiliation:
World Health Organization, Department of Epidemic and Pandemic Alert and Response, Geneva, Switzerland
*
Department of Quality and Risk Management, Queen Mary Hospital, 102 Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (whseto@ha.org.hk)

Abstract

Under the leadership of the World Health Organization (WHO), the core components necessary for national and local infection prevention and control programs are identified. These components were determined by a network of international experts who are representatives from WHO regional offices and relevant WHO programs. The respective roles of the national authorities and the local healthcare facilities are delineated.

Type
Who Network Report
Copyright
Copyright © The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America 2010

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References

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