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Acceptability and Necessity of Training for Optimal Personal Protective Equipment Use

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2016

Michelle Doll*
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia
Moshe Feldman
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.
Sarah Hartigan
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.
Kakotan Sanogo
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia
Michael Stevens
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.
Myriah McReynolds
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia
Nadia Masroor
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia
Kaila Cooper
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia
Gonzalo Bearman
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.
*
Address correspondence to Michelle Doll, MD, MPH, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, PO Box 980019, Richmond, VA 23298-0019 (Michelle.Doll@vcuhealth.org).

Abstract

Healthcare workers routinely self-contaminate even when using personal protective equipment. Observations of donning/ doffing practices on inpatient units along with surveys were used to assess the need for a personal protective equipment training program. In contrast to low perceived risk, observed doffing behaviors demonstrate significant personal protective equipment technique deficits.

Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:226–229

Type
Concise Communications
Copyright
© 2016 by The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. All rights reserved 

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References

REFERENCES

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2. Guo, YP, Li, Y, Wong, PL. Environment and body contamination: a comparison of two different removal methods in three types of personal protective clothing. Am J Infect Control 2014;42:e39e45.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3. Tomas, ME, Kundrapu, S, Thota, P, et al. Contamination of healthcare personnel during removal of personal protective equipment. JAMA Intern Med 2015;175:19041910.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Sequence for donning and removing personal protective equipment. CDC website. http://www.cdc.gov/hai/pdfs/ppe/PPE-Sequence.pdf. Accessed June 22, 2016.Google Scholar
5. Fisher, JD, Fisher, WA. Changing AIDS-risk behavior. Psychol Bull 1992;111:455474.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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