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Casting a Wide Net? Performance Deficit, Priming, and Subjective Performance Evaluation in Organizational Stereotype Threat Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 January 2015

Gergely Czukor*
Affiliation:
Sabancı University
Mahmut Bayazit
Affiliation:
Sabancı University
*
E-mail: gergely@sabanciuniv.edu, Address: School of Management, Sabancı University, Tuzla, Istanbul, Turkey

Abstract

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Type
Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology 2014

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References

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