Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Where Does Scholarly Critique End? Where Does…“Parody” Begin? A Mini-Contribution to a Mini-Symposium on Critical Book Reviews, with the Permission of Don Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

  • Ignacio de la Rasilla del Moral

Abstract

In a village of Europe, the name of which I have no desire to call to mind, there lived not long since one of those book reviewers that keep a soft-tongue in the lance-rack for his friends' books, an old buckler with partisan coat-of-arms as a mark of his feudal loyalty to his academic ancestors, a lean hack to accompany him in the dark alleys of scholarly fears, and a greyhound for coursing his civil-servant oriented career's ambitions. An olla of rather more beef than mutton, a salad on most nights, scraps on Saturdays, lentils on Fridays, and a pigeon or so extra on Sundays, made away with three-quarters of his income. His first years in academia were of such quality as to drive him to the verge of quitting this miserable life more than once. The rest of his income went to a doublet of fine cloth and velvet breeches to attend academic congresses, and shoes to match for holidays, that were always research-oriented, and on weekdays he made a brave figure in his best homespun.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Where Does Scholarly Critique End? Where Does…“Parody” Begin? A Mini-Contribution to a Mini-Symposium on Critical Book Reviews, with the Permission of Don Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Where Does Scholarly Critique End? Where Does…“Parody” Begin? A Mini-Contribution to a Mini-Symposium on Critical Book Reviews, with the Permission of Don Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Where Does Scholarly Critique End? Where Does…“Parody” Begin? A Mini-Contribution to a Mini-Symposium on Critical Book Reviews, with the Permission of Don Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All

1 “Figaro” and “Duende” as well as (vid. infra) “El pobrecito hablador” (literally, “The poor little talker”) are some of the conspicuous literary pseudonyms of Mariano José de Larra (1809–1837) who was a Spanish romanticist writer noted for chastising with satire Spain's 19th century ills in his work. A true classic of the Spanish letters, he is considered as perhaps the best prose writer of 19th-century Spain.

2 See: supra note 1.

3 As it is well known, despite the fact that the excerpts appear in the original between brackets, Miguel de Cervantes does not provide sources for the quotations he takes from the half-fantastic works of chivalry that he parodies in the opening paragraphs El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha (1605)

* LL.B., (Complutense, Madrid), M.A. (HEI, Geneva), Ph.D. (HEI, Geneva, 2010), LL.M. 11' (Harvard). Fellow Real Colegio Complutense in Harvard. Book Review Editor-in-Chief, Revista Internacional de Pensamiento Político. E-mail: To Julia, for the nursing quality of her good-heart.

Where Does Scholarly Critique End? Where Does…“Parody” Begin? A Mini-Contribution to a Mini-Symposium on Critical Book Reviews, with the Permission of Don Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

  • Ignacio de la Rasilla del Moral

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed