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Early Triassic disaster and opportunistic foraminifers in South China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 August 2015


HAIJUN SONG
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, PR China State Key Laboratory of Palaeobiology and Stratigraphy, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Nanjing, 210008, PR China
JINNAN TONG
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, PR China
PAUL B. WIGNALL
Affiliation:
School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
MAO LUO
Affiliation:
School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Melbourne Burwood Campus, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia
LI TIAN
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, PR China
HUYUE SONG
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, PR China
YUNFEI HUANG
Affiliation:
School of Geoscience, Yangtze University, Wuhan 430100, PR China
DAOLIANG CHU
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, PR China
Corresponding

Abstract

Survival and recovery are important dynamic processes of biotic evolution during major geological transitions. Disaster and opportunistic taxa are two significant groups that dominate the ecosystem in the aftermath of mass extinction events. Disaster taxa appear immediately after such crises whilst opportunists pre-date the crisis but also bloom in the aftermath. This paper documents three disaster foraminiferal species and seven opportunistic foraminiferal species from Lower Triassic successions of South China. They are characterized by extreme high abundance and low diversity and occurred occasionally in Griesbachian, Smithian and Spathian strata. The characteristics (small size, simple morphology) and stratigraphic ranges of these groups suggest that r-selection is a commonly used strategy for survivors to cope with either harsh post-extinction conditions and/or environments lacking incumbents.


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Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015 

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