Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Inheritance and morphology of exencephaly, a neonatal lethal recessive with partial penetrance, in the house mouse

  • Margaret E. Wallace (a1), P. J. Knights (a1) and Janice R. Anderson (a2)

Summary

An inherited exencephaly in the mouse is described, using embryos at 11–17 days gestation. The cephalic portion of the neural tube remains open on the dorsal surface, the bony vault of the brain fails to develop, and the tissues of the brain are exposed; the development of these tissues, which is somewhat variable, is described. There is strong evidence that the condition is due to a single recessive gene, xn, with full viability until birth. Penetrance is twice as high in females as in males, and it varies overall according to the genetic milieu studied, from 33% to 84%. These features, and the absence of pleiotropic effects and of genetic evidence of associated chromosomal anomalies, make its inheritance different from that of exencephalies so far described.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Inheritance and morphology of exencephaly, a neonatal lethal recessive with partial penetrance, in the house mouse
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Inheritance and morphology of exencephaly, a neonatal lethal recessive with partial penetrance, in the house mouse
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Inheritance and morphology of exencephaly, a neonatal lethal recessive with partial penetrance, in the house mouse
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

References

Hide All
Bonnevie, K. (1936). Pseudencephaly als spontane recessive (?) Mutation bei der Hausmaus. Skrifter utgitt ar det Norske videnskapsakademi i Oslo I. Math nat., Kl., no. 9, pp. 39.
Brown, K. S. & Harne, C. (1973). Recessive anencephalus in the oel strain of mice. Genetics 74, 231232.
Brown, K. S. & Harne, L. C. (1974). Genetics of two traits: cleft palate and anencephalus in the oel strain of mice. Teratology 9, A14.
Brown, K. S. (1977). Personal communication.
Carter, T. C. (1956). Genetics of Little and Bagg stock. Journal of Genetics 54, 311325.
Carter, T. C. (1959). Embryology of Blebby mice. Journal of Genetics 56, 401433.
Gleucksohn-Waelsch, S. (1961 a). Research News. Mouse News Letter 25, 12.
Gluecksohn-Waelsh, S. (1961 b). Developmental genetics of mammals. American Journal of Human Genetics 13, 113121.
Grüneberg, H. (1952). The genetics of the mouse. Bibliographia Genetica 15, 138144.
Geüneberg, H. (1954). Genetical studies on the skeleton of the mouse. VIII. Curly-tail. Journal of Genetics 52, 5267.
Grüneberg, H. (1963). The Pathology of Development. Oxford: Blackwell.
Kalter, H. (1968). Teratology of the Central Nervous System. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press.
Knights, P. (1972). Hydrancephaly. Mouse News Letter 47, 24.
Rugh, R. (1968). The Mouse: Its Reproduction and Development. Minneapolis: Burgess.
Searle, A. G. (1959). The incidence of anencephaly in a polytypic population. Annals of Human Genetics 23, 279288.
Seller, M. J. (1968). Personal communication.
Snell, G. D., Bodemann, E. & Hollander, W. (1934). A translocation in the house mouse and its effects on development. Journal of Experimental Zoology 67, 93104.
Snell, G. D. & Picken, D. I. (1935). Abnormal development in the mouse caused by chromosome unbalance. Journal of Genetics 31, 213235.
Wallace, M. E. (1965). The Cambridge mouse cage. JATA (now Journal of the Institute of Animal Technicians) 16, 4852.
Wallace, M. E. & Anderson, J. R. (1976). Exencephaly. Mouse News Letter 55, 10.
Wallace, M. E. & Knights, P. & Dye, A. O. (1976). Pilot study of the mutagencity of DDT in mice. Environmental Pollution 11, 217222.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed