Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-d5zgf Total loading time: 0.318 Render date: 2021-03-05T21:18:01.199Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Why make political finance transparent? Explaining the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO)’s success in reforming national political finance regulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 June 2018

Valeria Smirnova
Affiliation:
Faculty of Management, Economics and Social Sciences, University of Cologne, Köln, Germany
Corresponding

Abstract

If transparency in political finance is part and parcel of democracy, why do some countries adopt internationally agreed standards to regulate political finance in a more transparent way, while others do not? This paper (a) suggests a theoretical framework to address this question, taking into account international obligations, existing party finance regulation, and demands for greater legitimacy of political institutions; (b) introduces a unique data set of 46 member-countries of the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO) project operated by the Council of Europe; and (c) concludes that unwillingness to pay the high domestic costs of changing national regulation is the prime impediment to compliance with transparency regulation proposed by GRECO. Right-of-centre cabinets are, on average, associated with a poorer level of compliance. Interestingly, compliance with recommendations which reduce the privileges of parliamentary parties does not deviate from the overall pattern.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© European Consortium for Political Research 2018 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Abel van Es, A. (2016), ‘Why regulate political finance?’, in P. Norris and A.A. van Es (eds) Checkbook Elections? Political Finance in Comparative Perspective, New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 199226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beach, D. (2005), ‘Why governments comply: an integrative compliance model that bridges the gap between instrumental and normative models of compliance’, Journal of European Public Policy 12(1): 113142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bernhagen, P. (2008), ‘Business and international environmental agreements: domestic sources of participation and compliance by advanced industrialized democracies’, Global Environmental Politics 8(1): 78110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Börzel, T.A. and Risse, T. (2003), ‘Conceptualizing the domestic impact of Europe’, in K. Featherstone and C. Radaelli (eds) The Politics of Europeanization, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 5782.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Börzel, T.A. and Pamuk, Y. (2012), ‘Pathologies of Europeanisation: fighting corruption in the Southern Caucasus’, West European Politics 35(1): 7997.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Börzel, T.A., Panke, H.T. and Carina, D.S. (2010), ‘Obstinate and inefficient. Why member states do not comply with European law’, Comparative Political Studies 43(11): 13631390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Casal Bértoa, F., Molenaar, F., Piccio, D.R. and Rashkova, E.R. (2014), ‘The world upside down: delegitimising political finance regulation’, International Political Science Review 35(3): 355375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Casas-Zamora, K. (2005), Paying for Democracy: Political Finance and State Funding for Parties, Colchester: ECPR.Google Scholar
Cioffi, J.W. and Höpner, M. (2006), ‘The political paradox of finance capitalism: interests, preferences, and center-left party politics in corporate governance reform’, Politics and Society 34(4): 463502.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Council of Europe (CoE) (2003), ‘Council of Europe, Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member states’. Retrieved 10 November 2017 from https://rm.coe.int/16806cc1f1.Google Scholar
Council of Europe (CoE) (2012), ‘Council of Europe, GRECO’s Rules of Procedure’. Retrieved 8 June 2017 from http://www.coe.int/t/dghl/monitoring/GRECO/documents/GRECO(2012)26_RulesOfProcedure_EN.pdf.Google Scholar
Easton, D. (1957), ‘An approach to the analysis of political systems’, World Politics 9(3): 383400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Falkner, G., Treib, O., Hartlapp, M. and Leiber, S. (2005), Complying with Europe: EU Harmonisation and Soft Law in the Member States, Themes in European Governance , Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fischer, J. and Eisenstadt, T.A. (2004), ‘Introduction: comparative party finance: what is to be done?’, Party Politics 10(6): 619626.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Franzmann, S. and Kaiser, A. (2006), ‘Locating political parties in policy space’, Party Politics 12(2): 163188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Franzmann, S.T. (2015), ‘Towards a real comparison of left‒right indices’, Party Politics 21(5): 821828.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gauja, A. (2016), ‘The legal regulation of political parties: is there a global normative standard?’, Election Law Journal 15(1): 419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
GRECO Guidelines for Evaluators (2007), Retrieved 10 June 2017 from https://rm.coe.int/16806cc121.Google Scholar
GRECO Statute (1999), Article 18 on Statutory Committee, Strasbourg. Retrieved 27 September 2017 from https://rm.coe.int/16806cd24f.Google Scholar
Guzman, A. (2008), How International Law Works: A Rational Choice Theory, Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haughton, T. (2007), ‘When does the EU make a difference? Conditionality and accession process in central and eastern Europe’, Political Studies Review 5: 233246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaiser, A. (1997), ‘Types of democracy: from classical to new institutionalism’, Journal of Theoretical Politics 9(4): 419444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaiser, A. (2002), Mehrheitsdemokratie und Institutionenreform: Verfassungspolitischer Wandel in Australien, Grossbritannien, Kanada und Neuseeland im Vergleich, Frankfurt-am-Main and New York: Campus Verlag.Google Scholar
Koh, H.H. (1997), ‘Why do nations obey international law?’. Faculty Scholarship Series, Paper No. 2101. Retrieved 12 June 2015 from digitalcommons.law.yale.edu/fss_papers/2101.Google Scholar
Koss, M. (2011), The Politics of Party Funding: State Funding to Political Parties and Party Competition in Western Europe, New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Levitsky, S. and Way, L.A. (2006), ‘Linkage versus leverage: rethinking the international dimension of regime change’, Comparative Politics 38(4): 379400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
March, J.G. and Olsen, J.P. (2006), ‘Elaborating the “new institutionalism”’, in R.A.W. Rhodes, S.A. Binder and B.A. Rockman (eds) Oxford Handbook of Political Institutions, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 321.Google Scholar
Mendez, C. and Bachtler, J. (2017), ‘Financial compliance in the European Union: a cross-national assessment of financial correction patterns and causes in cohesion policy’, Journal of Common Market Studies 55(3): 569592.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Molenaar, F. (2010), ‘The development of European standards on political parties and their regulation’. Working Paper Series on the Legal Regulation of Political Parties, No. 04, March. Retrieved 21 July 2015 from www.partylaw.leidenuniv.nl/uploads/wp0410.pdf.Google Scholar
Nassmacher, K.-H. (2001), ‘Comparative political finance in established democracies (introduction)’, in K.-H. Nassmacher (ed.) Approaches to Comparative Political Finance: Essays in Honour of Herbert E. Alexander, Baden-Baden: Foundations for Democracy, pp. 933.Google Scholar
Nassmacher, K.-H. (2009), The Funding of Party Competition: Political Finance in 25 Democracies, Baden-Baden: Nomos.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norris, P. (2013), ‘The new research agenda studying electoral integrity’, Electoral Studies 32(4): 563575.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Norris, P. and Abel van Es, A. (2016), ‘Introduction’, in P. Norris and A. Abel van Es (eds) Checkbook Elections? Political Finance in Comparative Perspective , New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nwokora, Z. (2014), ‘The distinctive politics of campaign finance reform’, Party Politics 20(6): 918929.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nzelibe, J. (2011), ‘Strategic globalization: international law as an extension of domestic political conflict’, Northwestern University Law Review 105(2): 635688.Google Scholar
Olsen, J. P. (2009), ‘Change and continuity: an institutional approach to institutions of democratic government’, European Political Science Review 1(1): 332.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
OSCE/ODIHR and Venice Commission (2010), ‘Guidelines on political party regulation’. Retrieved 9 November 2017 from http://www.venice.coe.int/webforms/documents/?pdf=CDL-AD(2010)024-e.Google Scholar
Powell, E.J. and Staton, J.K. (2009), ‘Domestic judicial institutions and human rights treaty violation’, International Studies Quarterly 53(1): 149174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Przeworski, A., Stokes, S.C. and Manin, B. (1999), Democracy, Accountability, and Representation, Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 7–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Renwick, A. (2011), ‘Electoral reform in Europe since 1945’, West European Politics 34(3): 456477.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roper, S.D. (2007), ‘The differential impact of state finance on the Romanian party system’, Europe–Asia Studies 59(1): 97109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarigil, Z. (2015), ‘Showing the path to path dependence: the habitual path’, European Political Science Review 7(2): 221242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scarrow, S.E. (2004), ‘Explaining political finance reforms: competition and context’, Party Politics 10(6): 653675.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schimmelfennig, F., Engert, S. and Knobel, H. (2003), ‘Costs, commitment and compliance: the impact of EU democratic conditionality on Latvia, Slovakia and Turkey’, Journal of Common Market Studies 41(3): 495518.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steunenberg, B. and Toshkov, D. (2009), ‘Comparing transposition in the 27 member states of the EU: the impact of discretion and legal fit’, Journal of European Public Policy 16(7): 951970.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Teorell, J., Ziblatt, D. and Lehoucq, F. (2016), ‘An introduction to special issue: the causes and consequences of secret ballot reform’, Comparative Political Studies 50(5): 531554.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thomson, R. (2007), ‘Time to comply: national responses to six EU labour market directives revisited’, West European Politics 30(5): 9871008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Timus, N. (2010), ‘Europeanization through Transnational Party Cooperation: the case of EPP and Ukrainian Parties’. Draft Paper for 12th Biennial Conference of the European Union Studies Association, Boston, MA.Google Scholar
Trachtman, J.P. (2010), ‘International law and domestic political coalition: the grand theory of compliance with international law’, Chicago Journal of International Law 11(1): 127158.Google Scholar
United Nations (2003), ‘United Nations convention against corruption’. Retrieved 12 June 2015 from http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/treaties/CAC/index.html.Google Scholar
Van Biezen, I. (2008), ‘State intervention in party politics: the public funding and regulation of political parties’, European Review 16(3): 337353.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Biezen, I. (2012), ‘Constitutionalizing party democracy: the constitutive codification of political parties in post-war Europe’, British Journal of Political Science 42(1): 187212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Biezen, I. and Molenaar, F. (2012), ‘The Europeanisation of party politics? Competing regulatory paradigms at the supranational level’, West European Politics 35(3): 632656.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Biezen, I. and Casal Bértoa, F. (2014), ‘Party regulation in post-authoritarian contexts: Southern Europe in comparative perspective’, South European Society and Politics 19(1): 7187.Google Scholar
Walecki, M. (2007), ‘The Europeanization of political parties: influencing the regulations on political finance’. EUI Working Paper MWP No. 2007/29, Fiesole, pp. 1–20.Google Scholar
Young, O.R. (1979), Compliance and Public Authority: A Theory with International Applications, Baltimore, MD and London: John Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
European Commission (webpage). Retrieved 2 October 2015 from http://ec.europa.eu/enlargement/countries/check-current-status/index_en.htm.Google Scholar
European Values Study (EVS) 2008: Integrated Dataset (EVS 2008). GESIS Data Archive, Cologne. ZA4800 Data file Version 4.0.0, https://doi.org/10.4232/1.12458.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallup Jr., G.H. (2003). Americans Assess Democracy in the U.S. Retrieved 12 June 2015 from http://www.gallup.com/poll/9574/americans-assess-democracy-us.aspx.Google Scholar
Piccio, Daniela Romée (2012). ‘Party Regulation in Europe: Country Reports’. Working Paper Series on the Legal Regulation of Political Parties 18, pp. 1–92.Google Scholar
World Values Survey Wave 5 (2005–2008). Official Aggregate v.20140429. World Values Survey Association. Asep/JDS, Madrid. Retrieved from www.worldvaluessurvey.org.Google Scholar
World Values Survey Wave 6 (2010–2014). Official Aggregate v.2015041. World Values Survey Association. Asep/JDS, Madrid. Retrieved from www.worldvaluessurvey.org.Google Scholar

Smirnova supplementary material

Smirnova supplementary material 1

File 91 KB

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 38
Total number of PDF views: 306 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 11th June 2018 - 5th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Why make political finance transparent? Explaining the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO)’s success in reforming national political finance regulation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Why make political finance transparent? Explaining the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO)’s success in reforming national political finance regulation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Why make political finance transparent? Explaining the Group of States against Corruption (GRECO)’s success in reforming national political finance regulation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *