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Mental health innovations in Africa: lessons from Ethiopia and Zimbabwe

  • C. Lund (a1) (a2)
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Abstract

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Address for correspondence: Prof C. Lund, Director, Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Alan J Flisher Centre for Public Mental Health, University of Cape Town, 46 Sawkins Road, Rondebosch 7700, Cape Town, South Africa. (Email: crick.lund@uct.ac.za)

References

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Chibanda, D (2017). Reducing the treatment gap for mental, neurological and substance use disorders in Africa: lessons from the Friendship Bench in Zimbabwe. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences (This issue).
Chibanda, D, Cowan, F, Verhey, R, Machando, D, Abas, M, Lund, C (2016). Lay health workers’ experience of delivering a problem solving therapy intervention for common mental disorders among people living with HIV: a qualitative study from Zimbabwe. Community Mental Health Journal
Chisholm, D, Sweeny, K, Sheehan, P, Rasmussen, B, Smit, F, Cuijpers, P, Saxena, S (2016). Scaling up treatment of depression and anxiety: a global return on investment analysis. Lancet Psychiatry 3, 415424.
Collins, PY, Patel, V, Joestl, S, March, D, Insel, TR, Daar, AS (2011). Grand challenges in global mental health. Nature 475, 2730.
Gilbert, BJ, Patel, V, Farmer, PE, Lu, C (2015). Assessing development assistance for mental health in developing countries: 2007–2013. PLoS Medicine 12, e1001834.
Hanlon, C (2017). Next steps for meeting the needs of people with severe mental illness in low- and middle-income countries. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences (This issue).
Patel, V, Simunyu, E, Gwanzura, F, Lewis, G, Mann, A (1997). The Shona Symptom Questionnaire: the development of an indigenous measure of common mental disorders in Harare. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 95, 469475.
WHO (2013). Mental Health Action Plan 2013–2020. WHO: Geneva.
WHO (2015). Mental Health Atlas 2014. WHO: Geneva.

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