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Ebola

Since the first outbreak of Ebola in 1976, our understanding of the disease has changed dramatically. Traditionally understood as an infection affecting remote rural communities in Africa with limited potential for spread, the large outbreak that affected West Africa between 2014 and 2016, which claimed over 11,000 lives, has changed our perception of the disease, and has demonstrated its potential to cause major loss of life as well as major disruption to travel and trade. The outbreak that has been ongoing since 2018 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has claimed more than 2,000 lives and is a tragic example of the challenges of managing outbreaks in the context of a protracted conflict. The routine availability of a vaccine in this outbreak for the first time in the history of this virus, despite having a major impact, is not sufficient in itself to contain the outbreak, and the vaccine should be viewed as an additional tool alongside the evidence based control measures of case isolation, contact tracing and social mobilisation to reduce person-to-person spread, by encouraging hygiene measures, social distancing and safe burial practices. The evidence generated during previous outbreaks therefore remains highly relevant. This e-collection of Ebola-related articles published since the West African outbreak focuses on improving our understanding of how Ebola spreads, how it can be monitored, and how to improve the implementation of control measures. The e-collection is fully open access and should be a useful resource to those managing current and future Ebola outbreaks.


Original Paper

Ebola virus

Review

Zoonoses

Original Papers

Ebola

Original Papers

Zoonoses

Original Papers