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Widespread detection of antibodies to Leptospira in feral swine in the United States

  • K. PEDERSEN (a1), K. L. PABILONIA (a2), T. D. ANDERSON (a2), S. N. BEVINS (a3), C. R. HICKS (a4), J. M. KLOFT (a5) and T. J. DELIBERTO (a3)...

Summary

As feral swine continue to expand their geographical range and distribution across the United States, their involvement in crop damage, livestock predation, and pathogen transmission is likely to increase. Despite the relatively recent discovery of feral swine involvement in the aetiology of a variety of pathogens, their propensity to transmit and carry a wide variety of pathogens is disconcerting. We examined sera from 2055 feral swine for antibody presence to six serovars of Leptospira that can also infect humans, livestock or domestic animals. About 13% of all samples tested positive for at least one serovar, suggesting that Leptospira infection is common in feral swine. Further studies to identify the proportion of actively infected animals are needed to more fully understand the risk they pose.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Author for correspondence: Ms. K. Pedersen, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, 4101 LaPorte Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA. (Email: Kerri.Pedersen@aphis.usda.gov)

References

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Supplementary materials

Pedersen Supplementary Material
Table S1

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Widespread detection of antibodies to Leptospira in feral swine in the United States

  • K. PEDERSEN (a1), K. L. PABILONIA (a2), T. D. ANDERSON (a2), S. N. BEVINS (a3), C. R. HICKS (a4), J. M. KLOFT (a5) and T. J. DELIBERTO (a3)...

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