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Whole genome sequencing for improved understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in a remote circumpolar region

  • J. L. Guthrie (a1), L. Strudwick (a2), B. Roberts (a2), M. Allen (a2), J. McFadzen (a2), D. Roth (a3), D. Jorgensen (a4), M. Rodrigues (a4), P. Tang (a5), B. Hanley (a6), J. Johnston (a3) (a7), V. J. Cook (a3) (a7) and J. L. Gardy (a1) (a3)...

Abstract

Few studies have used genomic epidemiology to understand tuberculosis (TB) transmission in rural and remote settings – regions often unique in history, geography and demographics. To improve our understanding of TB transmission dynamics in Yukon Territory (YT), a circumpolar Canadian territory, we conducted a retrospective analysis in which we combined epidemiological data collected through routine contact investigations with clinical and laboratory results. Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from all culture-confirmed TB cases in YT (2005–2014) were genotyped using 24-locus Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and compared to each other and to those from the neighbouring province of British Columbia (BC). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of genotypically clustered isolates revealed three sustained transmission networks within YT, two of which also involved BC isolates. While each network had distinct characteristics, all had at least one individual acting as the probable source of three or more culture-positive cases. Overall, WGS revealed that TB transmission dynamics in YT are distinct from patterns of spread in other, more remote Northern Canadian regions, and that the combination of WGS and epidemiological data can provide actionable information to local public health teams.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Jennifer L. Guthrie, E-mail: jennifer.guthrie@alumni.ubc.ca

References

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